Blog Archives

Mego Batlab and Jokermobile: New Photos

July 28, 2016
By

Take an up close look at the original Mego Mobile Batlab and Jokermobile with these updated photos from Mego Museum founder Robyn Adams.

Mego_Batlab_Jokermobile

POTAThrone Photos Updated

July 14, 2016
By

Digging through old vacation photos, I found these shots from Mego Meet of the bizarro Planet of the Apes accessory, the Throne. One shudders to contemplate the horrors inflicted on the caged human. Probably merciless tickling by monkey paws.

thronebox throne throne_guy

Catwoman Kresge Card

March 11, 2016
By

We’ve added new images of a 1st issue Kresge carded Catwoman with blue tights to the Catwoman Gallery Page. She’s Purrrty!

 

Catwoman Mego 1st Issue card with blue tights variation.

Catwoman Mego 1st Issue card with blue tights variation.

Catwoman Mego 1st Issue Kresge Card

Catwoman Mego 1st Issue Kresge Card

Mego Solid Box Removable Mask Robin Up Close

October 8, 2015
By

One of the first four heroes created for the Mego World’s Greatest Super heroes line released in the winter of 1972, this solid box was phased out in early 1973. Removable Mask Robin was sold a short time after that in window boxes (6 panel mixed) and 1st Issue Mego and Kresge cards before being phased out in favor of the painted mask version.

Mego Solid Box Robin. A flawless example of a Mego Solid Box Robin from the 1972 World's Greatest Super Heroes line. When Superman is on the left, you know you are looking at the front of the box.

Mego Solid Box Robin. A flawless example of a Mego Solid Box Robin from the 1972 World’s Greatest Super Heroes line. When Superman is on the left, you know you are looking at the front of the box.

Solid boxes came with a cardboard insert for the header, these are often lost.

Solid boxes came with a cardboard insert for the header, these are often lost.

Note the shiny material on the mask and the strands from the inside backing fabric.

Note the shiny material on the mask and the strands from the inside backing fabric.

This is a perfect example of the first issue Robin with unfaded color. "Yellow sleeved" Robins were not manufactured, they are faded from the original green.

This is a perfect example of the first issue Robin with unfaded color. “Yellow sleeved” Robins were not manufactured, they are faded from the original green.

Observe the glue holding the elastic to the mask.

Observe the glue holding the elastic to the mask.

Ultraman Leo Mint in Box added to Galleries

September 17, 2015
By

leobox5

The incredibly rare Japanese exclusive 8 inch Ultraman Leo figure has been added to our Gallery page here.

leobox4

 

leo_box3leobox_2

Leo_box1

The Mego Museum is the premier website for Mego action figures, be they vintage or the latest exclusive new releases from Figures Toy Company, EMCE, Diamond Select and NECA.

Follow the Mego Museum on Twitter @Negomuseum

U.K. Starsky MOC

July 20, 2015
By

Updated the Starsky & Hutch Starsky page to show this gorgeous Palitoy-Bradgate card

Palitoy Bradgate Carded Starsky Figure from the UK.

Palitoy Bradgate Carded Starsky Figure from the UK.

Back of the Palitoy Starsky and Hutch Cards

Back of the Palitoy Starsky and Hutch Cards

U

Green Arrow MOC Variations

July 20, 2015
By

New images added to the Green Arrow Mego Museum Gallery Page

1977 A Green Arrow with Butterfly hole punch

1977 A Green Arrow with Butterfly hole punch

1977 A Green Arrow backside color variation with Aquaman purple

1977 A Green Arrow backside color variation with Aquaman purple

GA_butterfly_2

1976 Green Arrow MOC

1976 Green Arrow MOC

Green Arrow MOC variations

July 20, 2015
By

New images added to the Green Arrow Mego Museum Gallery Page

1977 A Green Arrow with Butterfly hole punch

1977 A Green Arrow with Butterfly hole punch

1977 A Green Arrow backside color variation with Aquaman purple

1977 A Green Arrow backside color variation with Aquaman purple

GA_butterfly_2

1976 Green Arrow MOC

1976 Green Arrow MOC

Updating: WGSH Carrying Case Pics

July 17, 2015
By

Updated the WGSH Carrying Case page with a photo of the 3 color variations of the case. Black, blue and brown.

Visit Gallery Page

Mego World's Greatest Super Heroes 1974 Vinyl Carrying case. 3 color variations shown: Brown, Blue and Black, which is the most common.

Mego World’s Greatest Super Heroes 1974 Vinyl Carrying case. 3 color variations shown: Brown, Blue and Black, which is the most common.

Update: WGSH Carrying Case

July 17, 2015
By

Updated the WGSH Carrying Case page with a photo of the 3 color variations of the case. Black, blue and brown.

Visit Gallery Page

Mego World's Greatest Super Heroes 1974 Vinyl Carrying case. 3 color variations shown: Brown, Blue and Black, which is the most common.

Mego World’s Greatest Super Heroes 1974 Vinyl Carrying case. 3 color variations shown: Brown, Blue and Black, which is the most common.

Zorro Mego Gallery

March 12, 2015
By

One of the top five Holy Grail Figures, this is the
only action figure ever produced from the 1950’s Disney TV show
popular in reruns in the 1970s. Mego created this 8 inch figure
only in England for the Palitoy company for only one year—1977.
It’s rarity, combined with it’s quality and the popularity of the
character make for an extremely expensive collectible.

Zorro uses Mego Galahad’s head and Mego Blackbeard’s
sword.

The shirt and trousers are made of a soft, satiney
fabric. The hemmed cape made of soft flowing polyester is fairly
unique among Mego figures. The body is a Star Trek booted body.

Here we see Zorro posing perfectly on a black Action
Jackson stallion.

Photos of Rob Chatlin’s Zorro by Scott C. Adams

beautiful Mego Zorro Figure

Close up of Mego Zorro hatless (Palitoy collection).

Below is a more detailed scan of Palitoy Zorros deluxe
cardboard accommodations, courtesy of the curator.

Mego Zorromego Palitoy Zorro MIB

Zorro Accessories



Loose Zorro


hat

The black Zorro hat is unique to the character. It is very similar in style to the Wyatt Earp hat, the big difference (besides color) is the material. The Zorro hat is a very flexible rubbery material. There is a factory made version of the Earp hat in black made by Classic TV Toys. The repro is a firmer plastic and has a much shorter crown. It is unmarked.



sword

Zorro uses the same sword as the Blackbeard figure from the Pirates line. It has been reproduced by CTVT. The reproduction is very accurate. It is a little less flexible and usually has a little flashing on the edges. It is marked CTV on the blade.




cape

Zorro’s cape is made from a different material than the rest of his outfit. It is a soft materal while the suit is made of a shiny nylon material, and has not been factory reproduced.




shirt

Zorro’s shirt is a shiny nylon material and is unique to the character. It has not been factory reproduced.




pants

Zorro’s pants are made of a shiny nylon material and are unique to the character. They have not been factory reproduced, however, pants from the Chinese Guerilla figure in the Lion Rock line are very similar in material and fit. They are often used as a substitute.




heads

Zorro shares a head sculpt with the Knight’s Galahad and Robin Hood’s Wil Scarlett. A good repaint of those heads or their reproductions can produce an almost factory reproduction. The Zorro head has been reproduced by CTVT. The reproduction is more narrow and has a more narrow painted mask and a more rounded mustache. The head is unmarked. The Galahad/Wil Scarlett head has been reproduced by Doc Mego, but with black hair instead of brown. No mustache is on the head, but this head can produce a pretty accurate looking reproduction Zorro head. The DM head is marked DM on the back of the neck, and is a little more narrow in the face than an original Mego head.




body

Zorro comes on the type 2 version of the trek boot leg body. The boots on the boot leg body are molded on as part of the lower leg. Only CTVT offers a repro of the boot leg body. CTVT’s bodies (marked Figures, Inc. on the back) tend to run a touch shorter, are more fragile, and have a slightly different design. A telltale sign of the CTVT body are the legs that tend to snap together at the knees.



The Waltons Mego Gallery

March 12, 2015
By

A testament to the licensing giant that Mego was, the Waltons was a bit of a departure for the action figure giant.

However it was not a gamble, as Neal Kublan explained when interviewed, the license came cheap (Mego was often brought licenses as they had such a great track record), the tooling for the 8″ figures already existed so the Waltons offered Mego a low risk attempt at the girl’s market.

Waltons figures came boxed in two packs and in single packs.

As a TV series the Waltons was a ratings smash, it spawned many imitators and created a pop culture catch-phrase with “Good Night John Boy!”. With this kind of heavy exposure, no doubt the Waltons paid off for Mego, maybe not something on the scale of “Planet of the Apes” but nonetheless….

The unproduced Waltons Barn

This 1976 catalog page shows the un-produced Waltons Barn with horse, wagon, and cardboard hay.


John Boy

 

Waltons John Boy Mego

 

Pa Walton

 

Waltons 1975 Pop Mego

Ma Walton

 

Mom Walton by Mego

.

Grandma Walton

 

1975 Waltons Grandma doll

Grandpa Walton

 

1975 Waltons Grandpa Mego doll

Walton’s Farmhouse

 

1975 Waltons Farmhouse by Mego

1975 Mego Waltons catalog

Walton’s Truck

 

1975 Waltons Truck Box

Waltons Truck Box Side

Waltons Truck Box Front

Waltons Truck Side

Waltons Truck Front

Waltons Truck Front

Waltons Truck Back

Waltons Truck Inside

General Store

1975 Waltons General Store by Mego

Waltons store detail

Waltons store parts

Some of the accessories included an old fashioned stove and a pool set.

 

The Love Boat Mego Gallery

March 12, 2015
By

Just hearing those words reminds me of Ernie (Ghoulardi) Anderson’s
promos for that show, remember that booming voice of ABC going "tonight
on the Loooove Boat"?.

A highly rated show at the time, Love
Boat
seemed a logical kid’s toy (Hey I watched it!).

Mego took what is a questionable approach with the line, however.
It would seem a toyline based on a romantic comedy series would
be more girl orientated. One would have expected Mego to create
a series of fashion dolls based on the female leads, instead they
chose a 3" line similiar to the
Pocket Superheroes
.

The figures were sold on blister cards which were often placed
in the boys section in stores in my town.

 

Mego Love Boat Playset

The Loveboat playset does exist, it was released in Canada by
Grand Toys. As you can see it’s a huge piece of styrene like the
Pocket Heroes
Batcave
or the
Star Trek the Motion Picture Enterprise Playset

Card backer courtesy of Troy, note that it uses simple one colour
line artwork, a cost cutting measure.

MEgo Grand Toys Love Boat Set

Above and below is a set of Canadian (Grand Toys) cards, which
are smaller than the US cards.

Grand Toys Love Boat set, Note that Isaac is called Le Barman in French

Grand Toys was able to market the Love Boat Playset because they
sent Senior executive Charles Marshall to Hong Kong to restart the
Lion Rock Manufacturing after Mego had gone under. More on this
later….

Starsky & Hutch Mego Gallery

March 12, 2015
By

The Mego Starsky and Hutch Crew

If you have it, go get your Mego Commercials tape #1 and cue up the S&H spots and crank the soundtrack thru your stereo. One of these days I may actually add some annoying sound loops to this site for the sole purpose of making sure that funky bass song accompanies this page. While you’re at the commercials, watch and enjoy again the kids JUMPING OFF buildings to jump the badguys just like their TV heroes! Oh, those were the good old days.

In 1978, Mego released this line based on the hit TV show with a blonde and brunette detective team. Sold quite well. I will confess disinterest in them, but as always, a few hours playing with them
on the computer has made me a believer.



Mego Reproduction artowrk of the  Mego Starsky and Hutch Crew

Original Reproduction Artwork of the Mego Starsky and Hutch Crew.

I think the added thrill is seeing a mint set all posed together. Toss in the Ford Torino? Suddenly, this looks fun. But let’s also investigate the players individually and get to know them up close and personal, shall we?

First, the SUPERFLY Huggy-Bear models the Starsky and Hutch Card art with a cool painting of the Grand Torino parked on the grimy asphalt of a dingy back alley where dreams are cheap and life is cheaper. Ahem.

Starsky

Det. Dave Starsky (Paul Michael Glaser)
Mssr. Glasser’s credits include “Fiddler on the Roof”,
“Butterflies are Free”, and TV’s “Single
Bars, Single Women”. He has been directing of late,
most recently behind the camera of “Kazaam”, with
Shaq O’Neil.

Carded S&H set courtesy of Scott Arendsen And Tom.

Mego Starsky and Hutch Two Pack
UK Dual Box by Palitoy, the boys actually carry guns, Starsky can often have
a Space:1999 body and Hutch has the UK issue leather vest(courtesy
of Bill Frost)
Mego Starsky and Hutch Two Pack
The boys as they appear in the two, all nicely tucked into baggies. Selling them this way is so nice and logical.(courtesy
of Bill Frost)
Mego Starsky and Hutch Two Pack
A good look at the insert that seperates the buddy cop team.(courtesy
of Bill Frost)
Mego Starsky and Hutch Two Pack
An inside shot of the two pack (courtesy
of Bill Frost)

Det. Ken “Hutch” Hutchinson (David
Soul)

starsky and hutch carded

mego starsky and hutch

Palitoy starsky and Hutch cards

Mego Starsky and Hutch Two Pack
UK Dual Box by Palitoy, the boys actually carry guns, Starsky can often have
a Space:1999 body and Hutch has the UK issue leather vest(courtesy
of Bill Frost)
Mego Starsky and Hutch Two Pack
The boys as they appear in the two, all nicely tucked into baggies. Selling them this way is so nice and logical.(courtesy
of Bill Frost)
Mego Starsky and Hutch Two Pack
A good look at the insert that seperates the buddy cop team.(courtesy
of Bill Frost)
Mego Starsky and Hutch Two Pack
An inside shot of the two pack.(courtesy
of Bill Frost)

GRAND TOYS STARSKY AND HUTCH FIGURE

This is a Canadian Grand Toys carded Starsky courtesy of Mark Schmidt. As you can see Grand merely stickered the US product to make it bilingual. All five of the Starsky and Hutch characters were available in Canada
GRAND TOYS STARSKY AND HUTCH FIGURE
Close up of the Canadian sticker.

Huggy Bear

Huggy Bear (Antonio Fargas) The Huggy Bear Mego figure has a lot of the character that it portrays, but it’s a minor oversight that they didn’t include one of John Boy Walton’s floppy denim hats that are more suited to Huggy. Mister Fargas was in many of the important “blacksploitation” films of the Seventies including “Shaft” and “Cleopatra Brown”. He also appeared in “Pretty Baby”, “I’m Gonna Git You Sucka” and had a regular role on “All My Children”. He will always be Huggy Bear to us, though.


Under-appreciated as a minor character in a lesser line, Captain Dobey
is nonetheless one of the better facial sculpts. The outfit, a kind of
denim leisure suit, is classic to it’s time.

Capt. Harold Dobey (Bernie Hamilton)

Carded S&H set courtesy of Scott Arendsen

In addition to his role as the gruff but lovable police Captain,
Mr. Hamilton was featured in episodes of the Dick Van Dyke show,
and the Twilight Zone. Film roles included Shambu in “Tarzan
and the Perils of Charity Jones” (1967) followed almost immediately
with the part of Chaka in “Tarzan and the Four O’Clock Army”
(1968) Mr. Hamilton apparently stopped working after Starsky and
Hutch.

Chopper


The figure of Chopper is not based on any one actor, but is more a combination of various bad guy/tough dude characters on the show. He is a pastiche, if you will. Nonetheless, I’m pretty sure I’ve seen him in reruns of Hawaii 5 O, Mannix, Barnaby Jones, and several other Quinn-Martin productions.

Starsky and Hutch Torino Car

Mego Starsky and Hutch Torino

It’s as cool as you’ve dreamed it was. A little
cramped, but very cool.

Didn’t think there was a point in collecting S&H Figures? This bad boy will change your mind in a hurry and be one of the prizes on the toy shelf. It’s pretty hard to find these days. The American Version of the car is motorized, one large wheel in the center of the car to propel it, and a swiveled “crazy wheel” on the front to spin the car in random different directions. The American version also came with police barricades, trash cans and a fire hydrant. The UK version shows up now and again, without the motor or extra accessories. Both versions have a working police light on top. You lucky folk with one in a box are invited to get some pictures in…



Below is the Palitoy (UK) release of the Torino. Palitoy removed the Alley playset pieces and the “Twist out” motor (most likely to keep cost down) but LOOK AT THAT SWEET BOX! Palitoy never seemed to slouch on Mego packaging, they obviously used many of the same artist that created artwork for the Action Man line of toys.
Palitoy (UK) release of the Starsky and Hutch Torino
Palitoy Starsky and Hutch Torino
Mego Reproduction artowrk of the  Torino
Original Reproduction Artwork of the Mego Torino.

Space: 1999 Mego Gallery

March 12, 2015
By

Mego Space:1999 was only released in the UK by Palitoy

Space: 1999 was a Gerry Anderson produced series meant to capture the popularity of Star Trek , at the time it’s budgets were the largest known for television. The philosphical first season was revamped for an action packed more Americanized second season before it went off the air in 1977. Lucky UK kids got this great Mego line distributed by Palitoy. Unlucky children everywhere else in the world got an inferior series of dolls produced by Mattel. Mego’s (lion Rock) European sales agent procured the rights for the series and produced the dolls exclusively for Palitoy, similiar deals have been done for lines such as Mego Doctor Who   for Denys Fisher and the Palitoy Zorro doll. As a whole the line is one of megos best works, oddly enough it ignores two of the first seasons principle leads (Barry Morse and Barbara Bain) which makes me think Palitoy thought it would be better to release two aliens over a woman and an old man.
Similiar thinking happend when Palitoy released the Mego Star Trek line, there is no Uhura. Mego Paul Morrow , Captain Koening, Captain Zantor and the Mysterious Alien get together for a great picture from BrAIN

The Mego Space:1999 Crew

1977 Palitoy catalog shows the Mego Space:1999 line up

The line up from the 1977 Palitoy Catalog, to view this Mego catalog and others go to the Mego Library Moving on to the back of the card we find some very detailed Palitoy artwork of the cast. Click on any head shot to go to that characters individual page .Kudos to design master Stephen Leach for his tireless efforts on this gallery.

Commander Koenig

Captain Koenig was called Commander
Koenig on the show. This Mego figure is a great likeness of actor
Martin Landau. Like Paul Morrow he comes on a Star Trek body with
white boots. He comes equipped with a comlock but none of the characters
had their stun guns. the Mattel guys have guns they can’t hold them,
so be sure to get some Dr. Mego repros to arm these guys to the
teeth.

Palitoy Koenig on his card, grey faced variants have actually been found so it suggests the figure saw production past one year. Card photo courtesy of Will (Surfsup)

Academy Award winner Martin Landau has worked for directors Alfred
Hitchcock, Ron Howard and Tim Burton to name a few. His portrayal
of Cmmdr. Koenig was almost an opposite to William Shatners heroic
Captain Kirk, Koenig often seemed cornered into the job as Commander
and often made brash “get this over with” decisions, a true space
hero for the “me decade”.

FILMOGRAPHY

Commander Koenig: Original Accessories and Known Repros

Loose Commander Koenig

 

pants

The white bell bottom pants that are unique to the 1999 crew members, has been factory reproduced by Classic TV Toys. The material on the reproductions is a bit more slick. The waist band is folded over the elastic and hemmed, while the originals are not folded over the elastic. The repro’s are a bit shorter and the piping on them has a texture, while the original piping has none. The reproductions are unmarked.

 

 

shirt

Koenigs shirt “kind of” has been factory reproduced by Classic TV Toys. The material on the reproduction is a bit more slick, is shorter at the waist, and kind of baggy around the chest and armpits. Like the pants, Koenig’s shirt features piping on one side (see above). CTVT neglected to add the black stripe down the right arm of the shirt, and left the black collar off, so the shirt is simply a white shirt with one black arm. It’s pretty easy to spot although it is unmarked.

 

Comlock

 

comlock

Comlocks have also been reproduced by CTVT and can be difficult to spot until you know the telltale signs. The repro’s are unmarked, and can be difficult to identify. The first thing to look for are comlocks cast opposite an original. Many were cast like a mirror image of an original, with detail and indents on the opposite side. This doesn’t apply to all since many were made orientated properly. Another clue is the button size. The CTVT buttons are larger than the original. There is also a line that goes across the top of an orginal separating the main body of the comlock from the top part. That line is missing on the reproductions. The final clue can be spotted on the clip. The ball shape on the end of the belt clip is much bigger on the reproduction.

 

 

belt

The 1999 crew belts have been factory reproduced by CTVT and are unmarked. These are almost exact reproductions in all aspects. Very hard to spot. The reproductions tend to be just a little more glossy and a little brighter yellow.

Paul Morrow

Paul Morrow was Moonbase Alphas’ beefy second in command. The Mego figure is a dead-on likeness of the actor

and Paul is probably the second hardest figure to get. For some reason, Paul Morrow did not appear in the second season and it was explained he had died somewhere in between the seasons.<.

Prentis Hancock has appeared in various TV shows and movies, of note are "Doctor Who" and the film the "Monster Club" with John Carradine. His

likeable portrayal of Paul was missed during the second season of this Gerry Anderson production.

Paul Morrow: Original Accessories and Known Repros

Loose Paul Morrow


pants

The white bell bottom pants that are unique to the 1999 crew members, has been factory reproduced by Classic TV Toys. The material on the reproductions is a bit more slick. The waist band is folded over the elastic and hemmed, while the originals are not folded over the elastic. The repro’s are a bit shorter and the piping on them has a texture, while the original piping has none. The reproductions are unmarked.



shirt

Morrow’s shirt has been factory reproduced by Classic TV Toys. The material on the reproduction is a bit more slick, is shorter at the waist, and kind of baggy around the chest and armpits. Like the pants, Morrow’s shirt features piping on one side (see above). CTVT neglected to add the wide collar around the neck that the original features and the red arm color is darker on the repro. It is unmarked.


Comlock


comlock

Comlocks have also been reproduced by CTVT and can be difficult to spot until you know the telltale signs. The repro’s are unmarked, and can be difficult to identify. The first thing to look for are comlocks cast opposite an original. Many were cast like a mirror image of an original, with detail and indents on the opposite side. This doesn’t apply to all since many were made orientated properly. Another clue is the button size. The CTVT buttons are larger than the original. There is also a line that goes across the top of an orginal separating the main body of the comlock from the top part. That line is missing on the reproductions. The final clue can be spotted on the clip. The ball shape on the end of the belt clip is much bigger on the reproduction.



belt

The 1999 crew belts have been factory reproduced by CTVT and are unmarked. These are almost exact reproductions in all aspects. Very hard to spot. The reproductions tend to be just a little more glossy and a little brighter yellow.



shirt

Morrow’s head has been factory reproduced by Classic TV Toys. The reproduciton is a softer material and is smaller than an original. The eyebrows are painted with a less severe look, and the mustache isn’t painted as long. The repro head is unmarked.


Alan Carter


Alan Carter (Nick Tate)

The Mego Alan Carter figure is the most unique in the line,eventhough he was pictured in the Palitoy catalogue as wearing a moonbase uniform Mego decided to put him in an ersatz version of his space suit (he was a pilot)but his helmet is all wrong and shouldn’t his hands be white? Still the toughest doll in the line and a fine likeness.

Alan Carter’s helmet was also used for Action Jackson, Dinah Mite and the Planet of the Apes Astronaut just in different colors.

The original Alan Carter prototype featured in the 1976 Palitoy Catalog showed him in his Moonbase Alpha unfirom. One might venture a guess that Palitoy decided it looked too generic to have three of their characters in white

Actor Nick Tate continues to pop up in movies and TV usually as a crusty “Crocodile Dundee” type. He has appeared on Star Trek:TNG and many TV commercials. Ironically, the original pilot for Space:1999 had Carter being killed but Tate proved so likeable that they kept him on.

MOC Carter courtesy of Type1Kirk!

FILMOGRAPHY

Alan Carter: Original Accessories and Known Repros

 

suit

Alan Carter’s space suit has been factory reproduced by Classic TV Toys. The repro is baggier, more noticeably in the chest and arms area. The material is very similar but the thread lines going across the torso on the reproduction is a touch farther apart than on the original. The collar on the reproduction is sewn in a little shorter as well. The repro is unmarked.

 

Helmet

 

helmet

Alan Carter wears the same style helmet as the POTA Astronaut, Action Jackson, Dinah, and the Mego Mystery Man, except in red. It has been factory reproduced by CTVT. The repro has a slightly different shape, especially across the top where the visor slides into the helmet. It is unmarked.

 

Comlock


comlock

Comlocks have also been reproduced by CTVT and can be difficult to spot until you know the telltale signs. The repro’s are unmarked, and can be difficult to identify. The first thing to look for are comlocks cast opposite an original. Many were cast like a mirror image of an original, with detail and indents on the opposite side. This doesn’t apply to all since many were made orientated properly. Another clue is the button size. The CTVT buttons are larger than the original. There is also a line that goes across the top of an orginal separating the main body of the comlock from the top part. That line is missing on the reproductions. The final clue can be spotted on the clip. The ball shape on the end of the belt clip is much bigger on the reproduction.


 

belt

The 1999 crew belts have been factory reproduced by CTVT and are unmarked. These are almost exact reproductions in all aspects. Very hard to spot. The reproductions tend to be just a little more glossy and a little brighter yellow.

 

 

boots

Alan Carter wears a pair of white boots, one of which can be found on Cheron in the Star Trek line. They have been factory reproduced by Classic TV Toys on their version Alan Carter and on the EMCE reproduction Cheron figure. Like the Mr. Fantastic boot, it is a factory cut version of the WGSH Hero boot. The CTVT reproduction is cut a little taller than the original, and is a little more glossy, with a lot of flashing evident. This version is unmarked. EMCE’s reproduction is also a little taller than the original. It is a factory cut version of Doc Mego’s white hero boot, and is stamped with the DM mark on the bottom. It is thicker than an original and also more glossy. Also reproducted by both companies is a tall white hero boot that can be cut down to size to make a proper height white Alan Carter boot. The repro tall hero boots from both companies share the same characteristics of the same company’s version of the short boot.

 

 

head

Carter’s head has been factory reproduced by Classic TV Toys. The reproduciton is a softer material and is smaller than an original. The eyebrows are painted a little darker as well. The repro head is unmarked.

Captain Zantor

Captain Zantor Peace loving leader from the Planet Kalador, Captain Zantor appeared in the Space:1999 episode “Earthbound” one of the finest episodes produced for the series. The Mego uniform is a very close likeness, he comes barefoot but I am sure he had shoes in the episode. Variations of Zantor exist, one has light blonde hair while the other has the correct white hair. Neither variation is more valuable than the other.

As you can see by the above carded Captain Zantor he is a white haired version while the loose figure is a blonde. Actor Christopher Lee is not really known for playing peaceniks like Zantor, he is best known for his work as Dracula in the Hammer series of movies. He is currently working on the new Star Wars film, so chances are Christopher Lee figures will be available again but Mego got there first.

FILMOGRAPHY

 

Zantor: Original Accessories and Known Repros

Loose Mysterious Zantor

 

robe

Zantor’s robe has been reproduced by CTVT. The repro robe is a darker brown and made just a touch longer and wider than the original. CTVT also added a turtleneck type collar where the original has none. The repro is unmarked.

 

 

vest

CTVT has reproduced Zantor’s vest. Overall it looks really accurate is design and size. The material on the repro is a bit heavier and softer. The original is a kind of stiff material. The biggest telltale is the inside of the vest. The mesh on the original is white, while the reproduction is black on the inside. The repro is unmarked.

 

 

heads

Zantor’s head features two variants, white haired version and blonde haired version (not pictured). Zantor’s head has been factory reproduced by Classic TV Toys, but only the white haired version. The reproduciton is a softer material and is smaller than an original. The eyeshadow paint on the CTVT is also taller as the distance between the eyes and eyebrows is greater on the repro. The hair on the reproduction has problems laying down properly and is less full. It is unmarked.

Mysterious Alien

These high domed aliens appeared in the episode "Wargames" (half
of the TV movie "Alien Attack") and they laid waste to Alpha in
order to teach them a lesson about trust. The Mego figure is a great
likeness, there are two variations on the costume, one has a turtle
neck look to it. the body is a typical Star trek body (which Palitoy
also used to produce their highly sought after Zorro figure).

Palitoy Mysterious Alien on his card. Card photo courtesy of Will (Surfsup)

Anthony Valentine has appeared in numerous TV and movie projects
including the "Monster Club" with 1999 cast member Prentis Hancock.

FILMOGRAPHY

Mysterious Alien: Original Accessories and Known Repros

Loose Mysterious Alien


robe

Mysterious Alien’s robe has been reproduced by CTVT. One big difference in the reproduction is the color of the material, which is a lighter purple than the original. Another is the material texture which is a bit more glossy. The final telltale sign is the collar that is attached to the robe. The original is kind of heart shaped, while the repro is straight across along the top edge. The repro is unmarked.


Collar


collar

The only real difference between the original and the CTVT reproduction here is the texture and color of the material. Like the robe, the repro material is lighter purple and a more glossy material. It is also unmarked.



head

Mysterious Alien’s head has been factory reproduced by Classic TV Toys. The reproduciton is a softer material and is much smaller than an original. The eyeshadow paint on the CTVT is also more pronounced. It is unmarked.

Logan’s Run Mego Gallery

March 12, 2015
By

the ad Mego used to promote their attaining the Logans Run license

The TV cast of Logans Run

In 1978, CBS TV launched their TV version of the smash hit movie Logan’s Run.

The TV version forgot about the movie’s ending and had Logan as a fugitive in a nuclear wasteland, aided by friends Jessica and android buddy REM, all the time being pursued by Logans ex-partner in killing, Francis 7.

Much like alot of seventies sci-fi, it was cancelled in 14 weeks after it was tossed around in it’s timeslot. Few would
have ever guessed that Mego optioned toys or that they were actually finished.

The Dedicated Collector

  In the mid 1980’s, Long Island Toy Collector John McGonagle began telling other collectors of a news report he had seen in the 70’s about toys. McGonagle claimed that the report showed what happened when a toy company invested in a property that failed (like a cancelled TV series)
A horrifying segment was shown: Cases of Mego Logans Run dolls being shoved in an incinerator. Collectors believed the tale and because McGonagle himself first owned the Ralph Hinkly prototype, believed that somewhere a authentic LR prototype would surface.
Summer 2000 was the first such occurance when the first two figures surfaced out of a private collection. In 2007, the Megomuseum uncovered the third figure in the series, titular star Logan Five.

This page is dedicated to my late friend John McGonagle, one of the nicest guys around. He was right.

Logan 5

Logan 5 prototype Rem Prototype Francis 7 prototype

Mego prototype of Logan Five from Logans Run

While REM and Francis have been spotted on very rare occasion this is the first time ever, that the figure of the star of the series has been seen. The Logan 5 prototype makes it debut on the Megomuseum.

Mego prototype of Sandman Logan from Logan's Run

Like Rem and Francis 7, the head is a Ken Sheller sculpted likeness of the actor (in this case Gregory Harrison), the body is a ten inch one exactly like those from Flash Gordon.

Mego prototype of Sandman Logan from Logan's Run

Currently, it is believed there are only two Logan figures remaining. The only figure from this series that remains to be found is that of Jessica 6, which would have a likeness of actor Heather Menzies.

A side by side comparison of the Logans Run tunics, the original prototype and one purchases from a blow molded doll in the seventies. Other dolls have been spotted wearing Mego clothes, no packaged samples of these have surfaced.

Francis

Mego

Logan’s former Sandman Partnet was the major villain in the series,
cropping up for most of the episodes with his entourage.

Mego prototype of Sandman Francis from Logan's Run

Francis was the series villain played with gusto by Randolph Powell, rumour has it Francis would have joined the rebellion in the second season.

No Mego weapons have been found for the figures, a major sore point as it’s one of the best scifi weapons ever made. Courtesy of Brian (palitoy)

Mego prototype of REM from Logans Run

REM was a character unique to the Logan’s Run TV series. One part father figure, the other part Mr Spock, REM was a two hundred year old android that Logan and Jessica find in a lost mountain city.

The Logan's Run REM figure by Mego was 10

Actor Donald Moffet gave REM alot of charm for a machine, as well as an easily bruised ego.

Rem's claw was also used for Mego's Biotron

A weird thing Mego did was to give REM a claw (very similiar to the Micronauts Biotron claw), while the character was often shown in pieces on the show, he never had this hand. Perhaps it was an attempt to make him more toy like. Rem’s claw is detachable but then so are the feet on this prototype so it’s not know if this would be permanent.

Happy Days Mego Gallery

March 12, 2015
By

Mego Fonzie was the only figure that sold in the line according to Mego brass

Fonzie



The Mego Happy Days line is one of the better television toy collections. Although there are some likeness problems, particularily with the dour Richie Cunningham, the collection is far better than Mattell’s Welcome Back Kotter Series, for example, if only because of the superior Mego possability and 8 inch scale. The Fonzie doll, with his jointed thumbs and “thumbs up” action through the mechanism in his back is one of Mego’s better efforts, and was a popular toy in his time.

Happy Days was the number family sitcom at the time, it was a logical choice for Mego to produce figures of these fabulous fifties characters, but to hear Neal Kublan explain it, the line only had one real bright spot for Mego. “Happy Days the first year was really
a bomb, but then Fonzie emerged” he adds “I don’t know how many pieces of the other characters we sold but the Fonzie doll sold like crazy for a year.”

The detailing of the high school letter sweaters on Richie and Potsie is particularily nice. This line was rounded out with a Fonzie’s Garage playset and Fonzie’s Motorcycle.

The line debuted in 1977 and continued in 78. Note that Richie and Ralph are wearing white tennis shoes with dark side stripes. They would ship with standard Mego dress shoes.

Two more figures and a 12″ Fonzie were planned for 1978 but eventually dropped.

 

Happy Days 1977 Mego catalog debut

 

Fonzie

FONZIE

 

pants

The Fonz wears bluejeans that have been reproduced by Classic TV Toys. The repro’s are taller in the waist, longer in the leg, and lower in the crotch. They also have a lighter thread than the dark blue mego used.

 

 

shirt

Fonz wears a white shirt under his jacket. The shirt has a collar and opens in the back for the thumbs up action. It closes with a snap at the back of the neck. This shirt has been reproduced by CTVT. The repro is more bright white, doesn’t have the collar, and doesn’t open in the back and no snap. There is a rough slit cut in the back for the thumbs up action level to stick through on the CTVT shirt.

 

Jacket

 

jacket

The Fonz has to have his black leather jacket. This jacket has been reproduced by CTVT. The collar on the reproduction is taller, and the jacket is shorter at the waist. The cloth at the waist of the reproduction is not as wide as the original and the opening at the front of the jacket doesn’t taper down from the collar like the original does.

 

 

boots

Fonz wears boots that can also be found on the Duke boys, Huggy Bear from Starsky and Hutch and sometimes on Hutch himself. These boots have been reproduced by CTVT. The reproductions, while the same height are thicker with a wider foot opening. They have a rough texture to them as well. They are unmarked.

 

MEGO FONZIE

FONZIE MEGO THUMBS UP ACTION

Fonzie came on his own card that supported his unique body type and
allowed kids to try his thumbs up motion. He also came boxed briefly
and was sold as a stand alone piece. This particuliar card came from
the UK and has a distributor name on it (Wiggins Teape Toy Distributors)
Italian Harbert Cards are known to exist as well.

Mego had planned to create a 12″ version of the Fonz and even sculpted the head, the figure was scrapped for reasons unknown.

Mego Fonzie on a UK version of his card

ayyyyyyy!

Richie

Richie Cunningham Happy Days Mego doll

 

pants

Richie wears an off-white pair of pants that are unique to the character and have not been factory reproduced. The Classic TV Toys reproduction of Richie sports blue pants.

 

 

shirt

Richie’s shirt has been factory reproduced by CTVT. The reproduction snaps from the opposite side and the pattern of the stripes are different, although the color scheme is the same.

 

Sweater

 

sweater

Richie wears a letterman sweater that is different from Potsie’s letterman jacket. This sweater has been reproduced by CTVT. The reproduction is shorter at the waist and the “J” on the front of the sweater is screened on, while the original has a raised vinyl letter. CTVT also added a screened “Jefferson High” on the back of the sweater that didn’t exist on the original version.

 

 

shoes

Both Doctor Mego and CTVT have made black shoes. Doc Mego’s are a little bigger in appearance. They are marked DM on the inside. Classic TV Toys version are more narrow and tend to look a little rough with occasional flashing evident. CTVT’s are unmarked.

 

Potsie

Happy Days Potsie Mego Doll

 

pants

Potsie sports blue pants that are unique to the character. Made of a heavy cloth, but not jean type material, these pants are a solid blue. They have been reproduced by CTVT, but the repro’s are a little more jean like. You can see some slight white through the blue here and there creating a more jean type feel on the reproductions.

 

 

shirt

Potsie’s shirt has been factory reproduced by CTVT. The reproduction is more yellow than the original, but otherwise pretty accurate. Another difference is the thread color. The original is more tan/off-white, while the repro thread is yellow.

 

Jacket

 

jacket

Potsie wears a letterman jacket that is different from Richie’s letterman sweater. This jacket has been reproduced by CTVT. Although similar, the blue strips on the waist and cuffs of the repro are darker blue and thinner. CTVT omitted the “J” on the front of the jacket and added the screened “Jefferson High” on the back that the original does not have.

 

 

shoes

Both DM and CTVT have made brown shoes. Doc Mego’s are a little bigger in appearance, and lighter in color. They are marked DM on the inside. Classic TV Toys version are closer in color, although a touch more red. They are more narrow and tend to look a little rough with occasional flashing evident. CTVT’s are unmarked.

 

Ralph Malph Happy Days Mego doll

 

 

pants

Ralph wears a pair of blue pants, but unlike Potsie’s, these are made of a stretchy material. These pants have been reproduced by Classic TV Toys. The repro’s are a touch darker blue and have a bit of a texture of tiny squares in them. They also fit more snug.

 

 

shirt

Ralph wears a white shirt that opens in the front but does not have snaps to secure it. The original is very transparent and the body can be clearly seen through the material. This shirt has been reproduced by CTVT, but the reproduction is a much heavier material and is not transparent at all.

 

Sweater

 

sweater

Being the stylin’ dude he is, Ralph wears a hip sweater vest. The yellow sweater vest has some orangish color highlights that run horizontally, and randomly throughout the material. This vest has been reproduced by CTVT. The reproduction has brown highlights instead of orange, and there is more of a pattern to them. A series of dashes in a very organized pattern, unlike the highlights on the original.

 

 

shoes

Both Doctor Mego and CTVT have made black shoes. Doc Mego’s are a little bigger in appearance. They are marked DM on the inside. Classic TV Toys version are more narrow and tend to look a little rough with occasional flashing evident. CTVT’s are unmarked.

 

Fonzie’s Jalopy

Fonzie Mego Jalopy

Fonzie’s Jalopy or Hot Rod was sold seperatly or it was sold as part of
the Garage playset. Later Mego pitched it as “Greased Lightning” for the proposed but never produced 8″ line for the hit film Grease.

Back to the Mego Museum Happy Days Page

Fonzie Motorcycle

FONZIE MEGO CATALOG 1978Fonzie Mego Bike

FONZIE BIKE MEGO BOX

The Fonzie Motor Cycle would later make an appearance as the CHiPs Cycle but the twist out action would be removed by this point.

Fonzie’s Garage


Mego Fonzie's Garage Playset
 

The Garage Playset included Fonzie’s Hotrod and is
tough to find. The backdrops for the garage are actual photographs
of a garage(!)

Mego fonzie hotrod


You can see Fonzie's Hotrod in there
 

A tight little package.

@Wiggins Happy Days 1978

 

Greatest American Hero Mego Gallery

March 12, 2015
By

Mego 3 inch figures were becoming more prominent in the eighties

Pam most likely wouldn't have been made for this series

Ralph and Bill: Pocket Greatest American Heroes

Note the Jack Davis Art

Mego did manage to sneak one Greatest American Hero toy into the market before shutting it’s doors, albeit in limited numbers. (pics courtesy Chris DVM)

The car and figures playset was similiar in concept and packaging to sets Mego produced for CHiPs,
Dukes of Hazzard and Pocket Superheroes.

In terms of rarity, this set does crop up from time to time, although the show’s cult popularity keeps the prices rather high. THe majority of boxed sets found seem to have “Kay-bee Tys’ Stickers on them, suggesting that these were exclusively cleared out at that retailer.

Picture cut outs like this were common on smaller vehicle sets

“Now Available Ralph,Bill and Pam Action Figures. Poseable 8 inches tall and Fully Costumed. Only by Mego” If only
that were true….

Ralph Prototypes

The Ralph sculpt is somewhat more cartoony than usual mego standards

Prototypes for the eight inch Mego Greatest American Hero line are extremely rare, This is one of the first two Ralph prototypes that were found at a flea market in a dollar box, one such figure ended up in the collection of Toy Collector Extraordinaire John MacGonagle.

It later ended up in the hands of John Bonavita, who shared it with the world with his ground breaking Mego books. In fact, Bonavita claims this figure was the thing that convinced the publisher to go ahead with his well known series. Above is that example, note the finished belt with symbol. Thanks to Bonavita’s educating the world, several more Ralph Hinkley’s have surfaced coming former mego employees and sometimes, their children! It’s estimated that are there 5 known but perhaps there are close to ten examples out there.

mego museum

Thanks to good our friends at Heroes West Coast, we have what is generally referred to as an embarrassment of riches. Not one but  three different stage Ralph Hinkley action figures, two early prototypes and a finished, carded production figure.

mego museum

You can tell that MOC Ralph is a production sample because of his head paint and his belt is show accurate unlike the other two figures.

mego museum

Prototype Ralph has a crude hand painted head along which is also much harder than the other example posted below.

mego museum

Note that this card also features a revised logo from the earlier version featured below. .

The Ralph sculpt is somewhat more cartoony than usual mego standards

This second example is the most recent to crop up, a former salesman sample it differs slightly from the example above, the biggest difference is the belt, which is greay and features a buckle. It’s postulated that this is an earlier sample as this was found in the same lot as the Bill Maxwell and the Walking Twiki Prototype.

The Ralph sculpt is somewhat more cartoony than usual mego standards

Ralph is waving to show something interesting, the divet in his hand. As pointed out by Roberto Ligotti, this trait is shared by several mego prototypes, including Bill Maxwell, Web Handed Aquaman and the Logan’s Run Characters.

The Ralph sculpt is somewhat more cartoony than usual mego standards

Ralph from the back, note the plastic snaps, commonplace for so late in the game.

The Ralph sculpt is somewhat more cartoony than usual mego standards

What’s unique about this Ralph is it’s the only known carded example, the loose cards exist, but they are rarely with a figure. The card is much larger than the WGSH packaging, more in line with the Dukes of Hazzard. What adds more evidence to the concept that this is an earlier sample is the card itself, unlike the Pam figure below,this card doesn’t feature a backer. It is merely a printed litho glued to a cardboard backer. The bubbles (there are two) are held on by scotch tape and not factory sealed, this truly is a sales sample, possibly used at toy fairs or buyer presentations.

 

Pam Prototypes

Mego carded Pam is the only one known to exist

This carded Pam actually surfaced in Scotland of all
places, courtesy of Max Espie. As you can see below, it’s a production
sample.

Pam looks like another reworking of the Nubia Head

It’s estimated that there are at least 2 loose and 2 carded Pam figures out there currently.

Actual production notes on this smple prove that it's a prototype

 

Bill Prototypes
Mego Bill Maxwell

Another terrific discovery this year provided by our friends at Heroes West Coast, this is a carded Bill Maxwell sales sample recently purchased from a former department store toy buyer. The sample gives great indication as to what the finished product would have looked like.

Mego Bill Maxwell

A close up of the figure, note it’s differences to the earlier Maxwell sample found.

Mego Bill Maxwell

The big Mego discovery of the year hands down goes to the recent find of an original Bill Maxwell sample figure from Mego. While other characters such as Ralph and Pam have been uncovered in small numbers, the figure of Bill (played by Robert Culp) has been largely feard lost. Now, MegoMuseum has an indepth look at the first reported Bill Maxwell figure.

Mego Bill Maxwell

The hair appears to be handpainted and while photographs white it is actually gray. What’s interesting is that if you look in the Mego 1982 catalog, both the 8″ & the 3-3/4″ Bill figures are shown with brown hair. But the actual production 3-3/4″ Bill was produced with gray hair. Maybe this explains the gray hair on this figure. .

Mego Bill Maxwell

Bill sans his jacket, much like Fonzie or Frankenstein (or most characters with a jacket), he has no sleeves.The material of all the clothing (jacket, shirt and pants) is very similar to the material used for Mego Frankensteins pants. The collar, waistband and cuffs of the jacket are a thicker ribbed material. The shirt is sleeveless & is sewn to the pants. All the stitching is factory machine sewn. The back of the shirt has 2 sets of the square plastic snaps, one at the neck, one at the waist.

Mego Bill Maxwell
Mego Bill Maxwell

Bill from the back, his pants and shirt are a one piece.

Mego Bill Maxwell

Bill sports Duke boots and a Chips watch. The body is a standard Type 2 Mego body with black lower torso.

Mego Bill Maxwell

A closeup of the head, a good likeness of actor Robert Culp.

Mego Bill Maxwell

Shot of the Bill figure from the 1983 Mego Catalog..

Article on Mego and GAH

Here is a 1981 Advertising Age article describing Mego’s launch of Greatest American Hero

Mego turns to “Hero” in licensing effort” (Advertising Age June 1981)

New York- Mego Corp lucked out when it snared the licensing rights to “Dukes of Hazzard” before that TV series became popular and it’s hoping lightning will strike again with “The Greatest American Hero”.

(Mego VP of Marketing Alan) Chernoff said Mego will have it’s “Greatest American Hero” action figures out in the shortest possible time span, six months, giving it an October retail introduction.

To capitilize on the series while it is hot, Mr Chernoff said Mego will use bodies from unsold “”CHiPs” figures and costumes from past Superman figures.

“CHiPs” is a Mego’s other TV property and not nearly selling as well as “Dukes” the exec said. Reusing old dolls figures for new characters is not new, for example, Mr Chernoff noted that Mego reworked it’s Diana Ross dolls into current Coppertone Candi.

Dukes Of Hazzard Mego Gallery

March 12, 2015
By

The Dukes of Hazzard first appears in the 1981 Mego catalog. Mego paid a mere $2,500.00 to acquire the Dukes of Hazzard license. The line became surprisingly popular and sold well due to the Dukes of Hazzard television show, which ranked as high as number 2 in the Nielsen ratings. Unfortunately, even this unforeseen popularity was not enough to save the floundering company.

The 81 line consisted of only four figures with two temporary additions, but is filled with numerous variations to keep hard core Dukes of Hazzard collectors busy.

The 1981 Mego Catalog featuring prototype boss hoggThe image in the 1981 catalog showcases the four 8″ figures. The Luke, Bo and Daisy figures appear as they were initially sold at retail, but the Boss Hogg figure hardly resembles the marketed figure and is very interesting for many reasons. See the Boss Hogg section for details on this figure and the possible reasoning behind it.

Kids and collectors were puzzled as to why Mego never made the General Lee car for the 8 inch figures. Some people have bought the 11 inch General Lee car under the impression it was for the 8 inch figures…Don’t do that. This is an odd omission since the whole point of the show was racing around in the General Lee. One wonders why Mego didn’t simply repaint the Starsky and Hutch Torino car. With the 8″ format giving way to the 3-3/4″ format, there were no accessories or playsets produced for the 8″ figures.

With no wheels for the 8 INCH figures, Luke and Bo have no choice but to resort to theft

Dukes of Hazzard Packaging

The 8″ Dukes of Hazzard figures were all packaged on blister cards measuring 8-1/2″ x 10-5/16″ and featured fantastic illustrations of the characters related to the show. It even possibly confused and tortured children/collectors by featuring Uncle Jesse and Rosco P Coltrane, who were never offered in the 8″ format. With no checklist of figures reflected anywhere on the packaging, parents or children had no idea what figures were actually available and could have been searching endlessly for characters that never existed with no chance to succeed. The card design was the same for every figure differing only by the character’s name and item number on the front.

Dukes of Hazzard mego packaging

The artwork on the back of the cards was identical for every character with no character specific information. The back featured the same illustration as the front, but smaller. A film-strip ran down the right side of the card with actual photos from the show. The only non copyright text on the back was: “The Dukes of Hazzard” and “Collect Bo, Luke, and Daisy to create your own adventures!”

The back of a mego Dukes of Hazzard Card

There is only one card variation that exists for Bo, Luke, and Daisy. Only minor text changes were made to the copyright statements by adding the registered trademark symbols to the line and character names. When the figures were introduced, initial cards reflected a 1980 copyright date. The main reason for the card revision was to add Copyright/trademark symbols when the show and character’s names were mentioned on the card.

The revised cards now reflected a 1981 copyright date. The 1980 and 1981 cards both have two lines of copyright text located at the bottom left corner of the cards. The top line on the 1980 card is significantly shorter when compared to the top line of the 1981 card. It is possible to distinguish between the two cards without being able to read the text.

The easiest way to differentiate between the 1980 and 1981 is by the copyright text located in the lower left corner of the card. The text reads:

1980 card:
The copyright information reads:
1980 WARNER BROTHERS., Inc.
Manufactured for Mego Corp., New York, N.Y. 10010, in Hong Kong

1981 card:
The copyright information reads:
TM Indicates trademark of WARNER BROTHERS INC. ‹1981
Manufactured for Mego Corp., New York, N.Y. 10010, in Hong Kong

Dukes Legal Lines

Dukes Legal Lines part deux

The text doesn’t even have to be legible to differentiate between the cards. The top line of text on the 1980 card is much shorter than the bottom line so as long as you can see the two lines of text, you can tell which card it is. The back bottom left corner of the card features the same text respectively. The majority of cards remaining are the 1981 cards.1980 cards can be found, but are more difficult to find when compared to the 1981 cards. With such a slight difference between the cards, most collectors will not pursue one particular version over another.
Even though the Dukes of Hazzard line was introduced in the twilight of Mego’s existence, the figures were all well done. For Mego and Dukes and of Hazzard collectors, all the figures can be found loose and packaged at very reasonable prices. The limited amount of characters, with numerous variations do create a challenge that is very obtainable if pursued. It is somewhat sad to realize that this was the last 8″ line Mego introduced and sold at the retail level. That alone does adds some nostalgic ties to collecting these figures.

Bo Duke

Loose Bo Duke

Bo Duke was initially released wearing a long sleeve off-white denim shirt, denim blue jeans with a brown vinyl belt and a circular gold belt buckle. He also came with black high top boots. The Bo Duke head sculpt is dead on and clearly resembles John Schneider who played Bo Duke on the television series.
Bo’s long sleeve shirt contained a sewn in pocket located on his left breast and also contained one set of snaps in the front. Similar to Luke, Mego quickly modified Bo’s shirt by eliminating the pocket and shortening his sleeves. It could have been a cost cutting measure, or giving the figure more flexibility by having the elbows open for unrestricted movement. The shirt was modified while the 1980 cards were still in production so Bo can be found wearing a short sleeve shirt packaged in 1980 and 1981 cards (see the card section for details on the 1980 card.

original bo duke card

original daisy duke card

original Bo duke card

Bo with log sleeve and short sleeves on 1980 and 1981 cards
When Mego shortened the sleeves on Bo’s shirt, they also slightly changed the material and design. The long sleeve shirt was constructed from a thicker denim-like material. The short sleeve shirt was constructed from slightly thinner denim-like material, but was not the softer more elastic material used on Luke Duke shirts. The pocket located on the left breast was also removed. The majority of Bo Duke figures contain this later style shirt. The short sleeve shirt was also a bit “whiter” than the long sleeve shirt shown to the right.
The long sleeve shirt was designed so that the left side of the shirt snapped over the right side. The left side contained a lapel that ran down the center of the shirt when snapped. This lapel was eliminated when the short sleeve shirt was designed. Now that the short sleeve shirt was a symmetrical design, technically either side could be snapped over the other. While the majority of short sleeve shirts have the left side snapping over the right, some were produced so that the right side snaps over the left. The shirt with the right side snapped over the left is much more difficult to find, although this is only the result of someone sewing the snap to the other side to break the monotony on the production line.
Bo Duke’s short sleeve shirts can also exhibit an unattractive discoloring. Quite a few of the short sleeve shirts can have a brownish discoloration to them. Whether it is a chemical reaction with the body resin or some chemical in the shirt itself, it is not pleasant to look at. Carded Bo’s can be seen with discolored shirts still sealed inside original bubbles. Finding a vibrant white shirt without discoloration will not require an extended search, but the discolored shirts are out there in numbers
Bo’s initial blue jeans were not baggy and had more of a taped or snug fit (for the ladies) when compared to initial Luke Duke pants.

Bo's pants became darker during productionWhile the material for Luke Duke pants was changed from the denim-like material, Bo’s jeans continued to contain the denim-like material for the life of the line. The only difference was that the color of Bo’s jeans became a bit darker. The initial light blue denim pants can be paired with the long and short sleeve shirt. The later darker jeans should only be paired with the short sleeve shirt. There will be some slight variance upon close examination, but there was not the wide variance seen with Luke Duke pants.
Bo Duke BeltsBo’s pants were held up with a brown vinyl like belt sewn in at the ends by the snaps. A circular shaped belt buckle was threaded through the belt and was able to slide along the belt from end to end. The brown belts can be textured or smooth similar to Luke. The shape of Bo’s belt buckle did not change like Luke’s, although there is one variation. Similar to Luke, very few belt buckles have been confirmed to be silver rather than gold. It is possible that these silver belt buckles did not go through the gold dipping process. The silver belt buckles can be considered an error, but are very difficult to find and seldom pop up. To date, Bo has only been confirmed with the circular belt buckle, but with Quality Control not being Mego’s strength during their desperate times, it would not be unheard of to find some figures that were assembled with Luke’s belt buckle.
Similar to the short sleeve shirt, the waistline of the pants was symmetrical so either the side could be snapped over the other. Pants seemed to flip back and forth between right side over left, and vice versa.
The snaps used to secure the shirt and pants were initially metal snaps that can be shaped square or round. Shortly after the long sleeve shirt was phased out, the metal snaps were replaced with white plastic snaps. Since short sleeve shirts can be found with metal snaps, it is safe to say that all long sleeve shirts should only contain metal snaps. The short sleeve shirt can contain either metal or plastic snaps.
Similar to the short sleeve shirt, the waistline of the pants was symmetrical so either the right side could be snapped over the other. Pants seemed to flip back and forth between right side over left, and vice versa. See the picture a little further down for examples of pants sewn either way.
Bo SnapsThe snaps used to secure the shirt and pants were initially metal snaps that can be shaped square or round. Shortly after the long sleeve shirt was modified, the metal snaps were replaced with white plastic snaps. Since short sleeve shirts and the polyester type pants can be found with metal snaps, it is safe to say that all long sleeve shirts and baggy jeans should only contain metal snaps. The short sleeve shirt and polyester type pants can contain either metal or plastic snaps.

Bo SnapsBo Snaps

Metal and plastic snaps can be found on Bo’s shirts and pants.
Many more short sleeve shirts and pants with plastic snaps were produced compared to the short sleeve and lighter denim type pants with plastic snaps. The majority of collectors does not care or differentiate between the plastic and metal snaps. All versions can be found with persistence.
The thread used to secure the snaps to Bo’s shirt was initially white and designed to match the shirt color. Since the thread color is very visible, both Bo and Luke shirts have snaps sewn to the shirts with thread targeted to match the shirt color. It would not be unheard of to see a Bo shirt containing a thread color other than white. This would be rare, but don’t throw it on E-Bay yet, as it probably will not make a difference in value. The thread used to secure the snaps to Bo’s pants was initially brown. You can see below how the thread color varied so much for Luke’s pants, but why was this not the case for Bo’s pants? It seems that only brown thread was used to sew the snaps to Bo’s pants. It would not be a shock and almost make more sense to see some Bo pants have snaps sewn with different color thread, but again it will have just about no impact of the value. You may even see an E-Bay auction advertising their loose
The various thread colors used for Luke’s pants are shockingly non existent for Bo’s pants.

thread variations on a mego luke Duke

Bo figure with the “the SUPER RARE Bo figure with red thread”. Go check out your loose Bo’s pants to see what color thread you have!

Graying Head
Bo and Luke heads are notorious for turning gray or discoloring. A large number of Bo and Luke heads have that ugly gray appearance also commonly seen on other later 8″ figures. Bo can have a gray head inside a 1980 or 1981 cards. The entire head can be gray or even just portions of the head can be gray. Towards the very end, Mego solved the graying issue as tail end Dukes of Hazzard figures and all 8″ heads no longer discolored to become gray. Finding a carded Bo or Luke without a gray head and on a high grade card can be done, but it is not that easy. When one becomes available for sale, the price usually is higher than normal.
All the Bo Duke variations can be found and will not cause you to skip a car payment to purchase them. High-grade cards with non-gray heads will command higher prices, but never cross the $100 threshold.

Luke Duke

Loose Luke Duke

Luke Duke was initially released wearing a long sleeve light blue denim shirt, denim blue jeans with a brown vinyl belt and rectangular gold belt buckle. He also came with black high top boots. The Luke Duke head sculpt is dead on and clearly resembles Tom Wopat who played Luke Duke on the television series.
Luke’s long sleeve shirt contained a sewn in pocket located on his right breast and also contained one set of snaps in the front. Similar to Bo, Mego quickly modified Luke’s shirt by eliminating the pocket and shortening his sleeves. It could have been a cost cutting measure, or giving the figure more flexibility by having the elbows open for unrestricted movement. The shirt was modified while the 1980 cards were still being used so Luke can be found wearing a short sleeve shirt packaged in 1980 and 1981 cards (see the main Dukes page for details on the 1980 card).

original daisy duke cardoriginal daisy duke card
original daisy duke card

(Above) Luke with log sleeve and short sleeves on 1980 and 1981
cards

different materials used for Luke Dukes shirt
When Mego shortened the sleeves on Luke’s shirt, they also changed the material and design. The long sleeve shirt was constructed from a thicker denim-like material. The short sleeve shirt was constructed from a softer more elastic light blue material. The pocket located on the right breast was also removed. The majority of Luke Duke figures contain this later style shirt.

Luke Shirt.
The long sleeve shirt was designed so that the left side of the shirt snapped over the right side. The left side contained a lapel that ran down the center of the shirt when snapped. This lapel was eliminated when the short sleeve shirt was designed. Now that the short sleeve shirt was a symmetrical design, technically either side could be snapped over the other. While the majority of short sleeve shirts have the left side snapped over the right, some were produced so that the right side snaps over the left. Here are examples of Luke Duke shirts on Vance with the left side snapped over the right and vice versa. The Luke Duke shirt with the right side snapped over the left is much more difficult to find, although this is only the result of someone sewing the snap to the other side to break the monotony on the production line.

Luke's shirt is often discoloured
Luke Duke’s short sleeve shirts can also exhibit an unattractive discoloring. Quite a few of the short sleeve shirts can have a brownish discoloration to them. Whether it is a chemical reaction to the body resin or some chemical in the shirt itself, it is not pleasant to look at. Carded Lukes can be seen with discolored shirts still sealed inside original bubbles. Finding a vibrant blue shirt without discoloration will not require an extended search, but the discolored shirts are out there in numbers.

Luke’s blue jeans were initially baggy (or relaxed fit), and constructed from a denim like material with metal snaps. This material was a bit darker and thicker than Bo’s pants. The material of Luke’s jeans changed the same time as the shirt was modified.

Daisy is more commonly found in these white shortsThe pant material was switched to a darker blue polyester material. The modified jeans no longer contained that denim texture and were now a solid blue polyester type blue material. This material was thinner and most likely less expensive. The color of the polyester type pant material can vary upon close inspection. A more significant color variation does exist. Some Lukes will have very bright blue pants. This was probably not an intentional change, but most likely just variance among the material or availability. These pants are too bright and almost look like pajamas. These bright blue pants were produced in limited quantities when compared to the darker blue pants and are somewhat difficult to find. The initial blue denim pants are the rarest of three versions. Either color of the polyester pants can be found with the bright blue pants being more difficult to find.

Daisy is more commonly found in these white shortsLuke’s pants were held up with a brown vinyl like belt sewn in at the ends by the snaps. A rectangular shaped belt buckle was threaded through the belt and was able to slide along the belt from end to end. All of the baggy denim pants contained this rectangular belt. The brown belts can be textured as pictured with the square belt buckle, and also smooth as pictured with the later belt buckle. When the pant material was switched to a polyester type material, the belt buckle also changed. The belt buckle for the polyester pants was square shaped with the top and bottom having an “arc” to it. One variation of this belt buckle does exist. Very few curved belt buckles have been confirmed to be silver rather than gold. It is possible that these silver belt buckles did not go through the gold dipping process. The silver belt buckles can be considered an error, but are very difficult to find and seldom pop up. To date, Luke Duke has only been confirmed with these three belt buckles, but with Quality Control not being Mego’s strength during their desparate times, it would not be unheard of to find some figures that were assembled with Bo’s belt buckle.    Similar to the short sleeve shirt, the waistline of the pants was symmetrical so either the right side could be snapped over the other. Pants seemed to flip back and forth between right side over left, and vice versa. See the picture a little further down for examples of pants sewn either way.
The snaps used to secure the shirt and pants were initially metal snaps that can be shaped square or round. Shortly after the long sleeve shirt was modified, the metal snaps were replaced with white plastic snaps. Since short sleeve shirts and the polyester type pants can be found with metal snaps, it is safe to say that all long sleeve shirts and baggy jeans should only contain metal snaps. The short sleeve shirt and polyester type pants can contain either metal or plastic snaps.
Luke Snaps

Luke Snaps

Many more short sleeve shirts and pants with plastic snaps were produced compared to the short sleeve and polyester type pants with plastic snaps. The majority of collectors do not care or differentiate between the plastic and metal snaps. All versions can be found with persistence.

The thread used to secure the snaps to the shirt and pants can vary. Unlike the brown thread that was consistently used for Bo figures, the thread color for Luke snaps can vary widely. Initial Luke Duke outfits had the shirt snaps sewn with a light blue/gray thread and the pants with brown thread to match the belt.

Luke Snaps

 

The various snaps and color threads used for Luke’s pants can create numerous combinations.
Once the shirt and pants were modified, it seems like they used whatever thread was closest. The thread used to secure the snap to the shirt was consistently light blue to match the shirt color, but the thread used to secure the snap to the pants varied significantly. White, light blue, blue, brown, and yellow are some of the colors that were used and pictured below. It can be theorized that white was for Bo’s shirt, the light blue matched the short sleeve Luke shirt, the blue matched the later light blue pants, the brown matched the belt, and the yellow was the same thread used to sew the pockets on the pants. It would not be shocking to see pants that contained even more colors since it is such a minor variation and hardly detectable. Go look at your Luke pants now to see what color you have!!!

Graying Heads

Luke with a grey head and long sleeves on a 1980 cardBo and Luke heads are notorious for turning gray or discoloring. A large number of Bo and Luke heads have that ugly gray appearance also commonly seen on other later 8″ figures. Luke can have a gray head inside a 1980 or 1981 cards. The entire head can be gray or even just portions of the head can be gray. Towards the very end, Mego solved the graying issue as tail end Dukes of Hazzard figures and all 8″ heads no longer discolored to become gray. Finding a carded Bo or Luke without a gray head and on a high grade card can be done, but it is not that easy. When one becomes available for sale, the price usually is higher than normal.
All the Luke Duke variations can be found and will not cause you to skip a mortgage payment to purchase them. High grade cards with non gray heads will command higher prices, but never cross the $100 threshold.

Dukes Menu
Boss Hogg

Boss Hogg was likely the least popular in the mego 8 inch Dukes line

Boss Hogg was the fourth character within the 8″ Dukes of Hazzard Line and was initially released wearing his classic white suit and vest. The outfit was sleeveless with a felt-like white vest with two buttons sewn in. A white bow tie was also stitched by the neckline. He wore a white blazer and came with white shoes, which were the same shoes used for the 8″ Penguin and Joker, but molded in white. Boss Hogg would not be complete without his soft rubber white cowboy hat. Boss Hogg only came on the type 2 pot-bellied body type also shared by the likes of Penguin, Mr. Mxyzptlk, and the Wizard from the Wizard of OZ (except with flesh colored hands).

Boss Hogg varations include the colour of his vest buttons, wow eh?Boss Hogg is a well done figure and nails the likeness of Boss Hogg played by Sorrell Booke. A testament to the accuracy of this figure is the lack of variations. There are only two minor variations for Boss Hogg. The first is the change from metal snaps to white plastic snaps for the outfit. The second variation has to do with the buttons. Boss Hogg’s vest buttons can be blue or black. The size can also vary as shown to the left. The smaller blue buttons are commonly  seen, but the large black buttons are much scarcer. Having a Boss
Hogg with the rarer large snaps, will most likely have no impact on value to anyone other than Sorrell Booke. Aside from the buttons and snap variations, the Boss Hogg figure remained unchanged throughout production. Boss Hogg is very easy to find loose and carded. With many carded Boss Hoggs on shelves for long periods of time and eventually marked down as clearance, high-grade cards do not pop up often.
                                         

original Mego Boss Hogg card  The majority of loose Boss Hoggs no longer have pristine white outfits, and even some carded Boss Hoggs can exhibit yellowed outfits while still sealed inside the blister. A loose Boss Hogg needs to be wearing a bright white outfit and blazer. Boss Hogg would never settle on wearing a yellowed or dirty outfit. Boss Hogg was packaged on blister
cards with his hat in a plastic bag and placed by his feet (unless you are holding the card upside down, then the hat would be by his head). If a carded Boss Hogg has the hat on inside the bubble, or not sealed in a bag, those darn Dukes were at it again because something is not right.

Boss Hogg only comes packaged on a 1981 card and never on a 1980 card. Even though Boss Hogg was
in the original 1981 Mego catalog when the line was first introduced, he was possibly introduced a bit later than Bo, Luke, and Daisy. It may be a surprise that Boss Hogg may not have been originally intended for the 8″ line or possibly a last minute addition. While this can’t be stated as an absolute fact, there are a few
facts which support this theory.

WAS BOSS HOGG ORIGINALLY INTENDED FOR THE 8″ LINE?

It can not be declared as fact, but it is possible that Boss Hogg was not initially intended to be part of the Dukes of Hazzard 8″ line. For whatever the reason, many facts do support the theory that Boss was a last minute addition to the 8″ line. Read the
following facts below and you be the jury.

Fact #1: The 1981 Mego Catalog

The 1981 Mego Catalog picture is the first appearance of the 8″ Dukes of Hazzard figures. Luke, Bo and Daisy all represented the
production figures which initially hit toy shelves at retail in 1981. The head sculpts and outfits all match what was used for production,
and then there is Boss Hogg.   

The original Boss Hogg Proto is crude at best

The Boss Hogg figure pictured in the 1981 catalog is nothing like the Boss Hogg initially
produced. The most disturbing thing about the Boss Hogg figure is that he is on a Type 1 body. This is not specific to Boss Hogg, but Type 1 bodies were phased out almost five years ago in 1976.
Why Boss Hogg appears on Type 1 body is unknown and very puzzling.  This does not specifically support that Boss Hogg was a last minute addition, but only that Mego still had Type 1 bodies lying around the company as late as 1981. The head sculpt does not match what was eventually used in production and appears to be hand made sample. Boss Hogg’s outfit also appears to be a quick handmade prototype. The blazer in the 1981 catalog contained coat-tails and had pockets drawn in with black marker. The production blazer did not have coat-tails or pockets. You can see how the back bottom edge of the blazer and how the coat-tails are attached as separate pieces. The bow tie and vest were also drawn rather than the sewn in buttons and bow
tie eventually used in production. Since only the Boss Hogg figure differs from the figure used in production, it is possible that once the last minute decision to include Boss Hogg as part of the 8″ line was made, Mego scrambled to put something together to photograph for the catalog. If all four figures were developed
simultaneously, the Boss Hogg figure would have represented the production figures like the others. This alone does not prove the point, but keep reading.

Fact # 2: The figure item numbers

The item numbers for the 8″ Dukes of Hazzard figures are as follows:

Bo: 09050/1
Luke: 09050/2
Daisy: 09050/3
Boss Hogg: 09050/4

Boss Hogg has the very last item number

Boss Hogg’s item number is last in the sequence. If his item number was before any of the figures, it would disprove the theory that he was a last minute addition. Not only is Boss Hogg’s item number the last, it differs slightly in appearance on the card when compared to the others. The Bo, Luke and Daisy item numbers are identical except for the numbers themselves. The Boss Hogg item number is not as bold. It can be theorized that the Bo, Luke, and Daisy card artwork was created simultaneously and therefore have the exact appearance. It is possible that once the last minute decision to include Boss Hogg was made, his card artwork was created separately, but the item number appeared slightly different. Convinced yet? The card artwork also provides some insight, which is detailed in fact #3.

Fact #3: The card artwork

Why is Boss Hogg so dang small?

In addition to the item numbers, the card artwork has strong evidence to support that Boss Hogg was a last minute addition or possibly not originally intended to be part of the 8″ line. The Dukes of Hazzard image reflected on the card is very telling. Bo’s, Luke’s, and Daisy’s head are all the same size in the illustration. It can be interpreted that the largest illustrations were of figures intended for the line. Of the six characters, in the illustration, Boss Hogg is actually the smallest. Based on the image sizes, it would appear that Uncle Jesse would have been a figure before Boss Hogg.

To date, no Boss Hoggs have been confirmed on a 1980 card, only on 1981 cards. The Boss Hogg card is unique when compared to the other 1980 and 1981 cards. The text for the 1980 and 1981 cards are shown side by side with the Boss Hogg card. The text on the Boss Hogg card does match the 1981 cards with the exception of the Warner Brothers name not being all caps. It again supports that the Boss Hogg card was designed separately from the others and probably after the 1980 card, but before the 1981 card.

Boss Hogg Copyright text gives some support to the theory he was an afterthough

Why no mention of Boss?

The most compelling evidence is in the text below the illustration. The text “Collect Bo, Luke, and Daisy to create your own adventures.”
is the same on the 1980 and 1981 cards for every character (even Boss Hogg’s). It is very possible that Boss Hogg was not part of the 8″ line when the 1980 card artwork was designed and not added to this statement. Even when the cards were revised to add the copyright and trademark symbols for the 1981 card, revising
this statement was most likely overlooked and didn’t change.

( Editors Note: It should also be mentioned that at the time, Mego seemed to be moving towards producing 8″ figures with no villain,
both Chips and the Greatest American Hero were sets of three good guys with no baddies to speak of)

Handsome Devil heWhile it could never be declared a fact that Boss Hogg was not initially intended to be part of the 8″ Dukes of Hazzard line, the evidence stated above makes a very strong case. It was a good decision because what adventures can you have if there is no villain?

It is also interesting that no Boss Hogg figures have ever surfaced with gray heads. This might be pure coincidence and luck that the particular resin that discolors just was not used for molding Boss Hogg heads. This could be interpreted some way to also support that Boss Hogg was introduced later. Since Luke and Bo on 1980 cards can both have gray heads, and Boss Hogg only comes on a 1981 card, maybe Boss Hogg was introduced after the discoloring resin was used and exhausted. This may be a stretch, but the evidence above is much more sound than this. Let’s just say it was luck that no Boss Hogg heads ever turned gray.

KISS ME!Boss Hogg, introduced later or at the same time as the other 8″ figures, is still very easy to find  loose or carded. Damaged or worn cards are out there in great numbers to open and finally get
that mint loose Boss Hogg. Be careful though, because behind some of those yellowed bubbles might be a discolored outfit and not the pristine white outfit you expected. Carded Boss Hoggs are again easy to find, but high-grade cards are getting scarcer. Scarce or not, Boss Hogg will always remain well under the $100 threshold. The Mego Musuem would love to revise this last statement so keep buying.

Loose Boss Hogg

hat

Boss Hogg wears a white cowboy hat that is unique to the character and has not been factory reproduced.

 

shoes

Boss Hogg wears a white pair of dress shoes made from the same mold as the brown and black dress shoes found on many characters in the WGSH line and scattered through a few other lines. The white color is unique to the character, and while the black and brown versions have been factory reproduced, the white dress shoe has not, although Classic TV Toys does make a white sneaker that is somewhat similar in appearance.

Daisy Duke

Daisy Duke was the third 8″ Dukes of Hazzard figure and was released initially wearing a green shirt and her infamous “Daisy Duke” blue denim shorts. She also came wearing white sandals. Daisy was only issued on the later style female body with unjointed wrists, elbows, and knees and was never produced with the 1st version female body containing jointed wrists, elbows, and knees

original daisy duke card
Daisy’s green shirt and blue shorts quickly changed to a blue shirt with white shorts. How could Mego get rid of the blue denim Daisy Duke shorts in favor of the white shorts? The photo of Daisy on the back of the card did have the blue shirt and white shorts, so maybe they wanted the figure to match what was pictured on the card. The majority of Daisy outfits contain the later blue shirt/white shorts. Finding a loose or carded Daisy with the initial green shirt and blue shorts can be done, but is not easy. Daisy with a green shirt/blue shorts will command higher prices when one becomes available for sale.                     The green shirt and blue shorts initially contained metal snaps similar to the other initial outfits for Bo, Luke, and Boss Hogg. It has not been confirmed, but most likely all green shirts and blue shorts contained metal snaps. Until a blue shirt with white shorts Daisy Duke is confirmed with metal snaps, this can not be stated as fact. Check your Daisy Dukes (I meant the figures) to see if your blue shirt or white shorts have metal snaps, notify the Museum immediately!
Daisy's sandals.Daisy Duke came with white plastic sandals that were unfortunately very easy to lose. The very thin strap around the ankle made the sandals very fragile and prone to breaking. The majority of loose Daisy Dukes will not have sandals so the easiest route of getting them may be freeing a Daisy from a worn card.

Daisy’s head sculpt pales in comparison to the other characters within the 8″ line. Bo, Luke, and Boss Hogg were all exquisite sculpts while Daisy hardly resembled Catherine Bach and seemed a bit too large for her body. Through fantastic detective work by James Brady, the reason for this lackluster sculpt was uncovered. Daisy’s head sculpt was simply a shrunken down version of the 12″ Wonder Woman Nubia sculpt. Read the amazing thread below to see how this unfolded and was solved.

The true origin of Daisy Duke

the Daisy Duke head was a reused Ken Sheller Sculpt from the Wonder Woman linethe Daisy Duke head was a reused Ken Sheller Sculpt from the Wonder Woman line

Daisy’s head can exhibit some discoloration, but different than the graying frequently seen on Luke and Bo. Some Daisy heads can be very pale or yellowish in color. This could be a chemical reaction, but whatever the reason, is very unpleasant to look at.

Daisy Duke comes packaged with a clear plastic band around her head to hold her hair in place. Once that plastic band came off, look out! That big head, with her very long hair creates a recipe for disaster. Some Daisy Dukes look as if she stuck a fork in an electrical socket not once, but twice. There is something to be said for a Dais

Loose Daisy Duke

y Duke with neat hair or even the plastic band still around her head.

Daisy is more commonly found in these white shortsDaisy came packaged on a 1980 and 1981 card. The green shirt and blue shorts figures only appear on the 1980 card. The blue shirt and white shorts figures can come on a 1980 or 1981 card. A Daisy with the blue shirt/white shorts is very difficult to find on the 1980 card. Carded Daisy Dukes consistently command the highest values of any Dukes character with the exception of Vance. Daisy Duke was the very last 8″ female character that Mego ever produced. Most of the time, the Daisy Duke figure looks stiff and big headed, but when properly positioned, the figure can look decent. Who wouldn’t want a mini-Daisy Duke to play with? .  The “Mego Dukes of Hazzard” Gallery would not have been possible without the fantastic contributions and assistance of Tom.

Coy Duke

Coy Duke figures were produced when John Schneider left the seriesWhen
John Schneider and Tom Wopat abruptly left the show over a merchandising
dispute (which Mego was obviously a part of), the network scrambled
by having their cousins Coy and Vance
replace them. Coy was played by then well-known actor Byron Cherry
(insert sarcastic tone), while Christopher Mayer who was just as
famous, played Vance. Mego also responded by designing new head-sculpts
for both characters. New heads were sculpted, but the outfits and
packaging remained the same. Since Coy and Vance came on Bo and
Luke cards, no unique item numbers were assigned for the figures.
Vance figures were produced to fill the gap for Luke Duke

Vance headsculpt

In addition to the 8″ figures, Mego also produced 3-3/4″
Coy and Vance figures. No “changes” were made with the
only difference being the chest portions of the shirts for Bo and
Luke were swapped. A 3-3/4″ Coy had blond hair, wore a blue
shirt, with blue pants. A 3-3/4″ Vance had brown hair, wore
a tan shirt with blue pants. The 3-3/4″ Coy and Vance are much
rarer than the 8″ versions and just about non-existent.

Coy headsculpt
Mego never bothered to print new cards reflecting their names so
Coy was packaged in Bo’s card and Vance was packaged in Luke’s card.
This makes it somewhat difficult to identify a carded Coy and Vance
without a decent picture. It also can help in snagging a carded
Coy or Vance for a bargain.

Coy came on a Bo Card.   Vance came on a Luke Card.
It is also interesting that unlike the 8″ figures, Mego decided
to sticker the blister cards for the 3-3/4″ Coy and Vance to
reflect the proper names. A small sticker bearing the Coy or Vance
name was placed over the existing name. The sticker had a blue background
to match the card color and the white text reflecting the figure’s
name.

Both but can still be found. Luke and 8″ figures were produced
in much smaller quantities and are much more difficult to find compared
to Bo and Luke, Bo worked out whatever monetary issues they had
and quickly came back to the show. Coy and Vance were gone as quick
as they came. It would make sense that both were packed at the same
ratio within a case, but for some reason Vance is much more difficult
to find than Coy.

With Coy and Vance’s fast entrance and exit, it is difficult to
pinpoint the exact timing. There are a few things that can generalize
the timing based on relative changes. Coy and Vance only came packaged
on 1981 cards. Coy and Vance should only appear wearing the short
sleeve shirts since they were introduced after the long sleeve shirts
with pocket were phased out.

Coy MOC with metal snaps

No Coy and Vance figures have been confirmed with gray heads,
so they were most likely introduced after the particular resin that
discolored to a “gray” color was used. A gray Coy and
Vance head if confirmed, would be very rare, but not the rare you
want. Maybe someone will now concoct a method for turning heads
gray?    Coy and Vance can be found with metal and plastic
snaps on their shirts and pants. Evidence suggests that the transition
from metal to plastic snaps for the Dukes was not absolute and it
is very possible that metal snaps were used after plastic snaps
were already introduced. The majority of Coy and Vance figures will
contain plastic snaps, but Coy and Vance with metal snaps do exist
and are much more difficult to find. Pictured is a carded Coy with
metal snaps.

This may sound like a tongue twister, but here
is why components were most likely not completely exhausted before
their replacement was used. A Bo Duke can be found on a 1980 card
with short sleeves and plastic snaps. A Coy Duke can be found on
a 1981 card with short sleeves and metal snaps. If metal snaps preceded
plastic snaps and 1980 cards preceded 1981 cards, something had
to be re-introduced in order to have both combinations listed above.

Vance

Confused yet? The bottom line is,
aside from the long sleeve shirts and baggy Luke pants, all the
variations found on Bo and Luke figures can also be found on Coy
and Vance figures  The Coy and Vance figures are unique in
the fact that they were two temporary additions to the 8″ Dukes
of Hazzard line. With no Coy and Vance item numbers, no packages
reflecting their name, and no appearance in the retail catalogs,
it almost seems like they never really existed. Coy and Vance are
the scarcest and most limited from a production quantity standpoint.
Coy is much easier to find, but Vance is probably the toughest figure
of all the 8″ Dukes figures to find loose and carded.

Loose Coy Duke

Loose Vance Duke

 

boots

The Duke Boys wear boots that can also be found on the Fonz from the Happy Days line, Huggy Bear from Starsky and Hutch and sometimes on Hutch himself. These boots have been reproduced by CTVT. The reproductions, while the same height are thicker with a wider foot opening. They have a rough texture to them as well. They are unmarked.

 

3.75″ Dukes Toys

The Dukes of Hazzard was Mego's last great line

 

Intro

 

By the late nineteen seventies, most sandboxes were being filled figures in the 3 3/4″ format.
Mego, who was once the market leader with the 8″ format simply followed suit and produced most of their toy licenses as 3 3/4″ figures including CHiPs and sci fi efforts such as Buck Rogers

What is unique about these figures is that unlike many of the other 3 3/4″ Mego lines, the Dukes don’t seem to fit any one body style but seem to use bits and pieces from all of Mego’s other lines.

The Mego 3 3/4″ Dukes line was a runaway hit and sold enough to warrant a second series, vehicles and (almost) a playset!

Figures

 

images/Mego Bo Duke

Bo and Luke Duke (Version 1)

For the Boys, Mego used the highly articulated body style that was used for lines such as The Black Hole and Buck Rogers.

Boss Hogg and Daisy (although this is a later head sculpt) rounded out the first series. Boss had a Pocket heroes style body while Daisy emulated that of the Star Trek the motion picture line.

. Mego Roscoe P Coltrane Mego Deputy Cletus

Roscoe and Cletus (pictured above) were in the second wave of figures and featured a body style similiar to the Pocket Superheroes. Mego fans will instantly noticed the recycled parts from CB McHaul.

Mego Cooter Mego Uncle Jesse

To round out the second series we have Cooter and Uncle Jesse, two figures that never made it to the 8″ format. Both figures can be tricky to find in the secondary market.

Playset

 

Cooters garage by mego

Mego featured a “Cooter’s Garage” playset in their 1982 catalog, as you can see by looking at the photo it’s a rather home made affair (the company was starting to struggle with R&D money) Despite the overwhelming popularity of the series at the time, it’s no surprise that buyers passed on this somewhat uninteresting playset. Without something that tied into the series (like being able to repair the vehicles) it’s just another vacuform shell.

Cooters garage by mego

Cars

 

It’s all about the cars when you’re talking the Dukes and it’s high time we featured them. All photos are from the collection of Chris Johnson.

Mego Cooter

The General Lee came with a variety of bonus figures, often the Duke boys but occasionally characters like Uncle Jesse and Cooter as well.

Mego Cooter

Mego Cooter

Mego Cooter

Daisy always came with her Jeep however.

Mego Cooter

Mego Cooter

Catherine Bach was a strong selling point

Dr. Who Mego Gallery

March 12, 2015
By

The Doctor

Even though more than 9 actors have portrayed the Doctor,
no actor has embodied the part more than Tom Baker. His contribution
to the part has effectively made him a permanent part of pop culture.

Mego didn’t miss a detail
of the Doctor’s costume from his hat to trademark scarf and sonic
screwdriver. Some controversy exists that the head sculpt is actually
borrowed from Gambit of the scrapped "New Avengers" line of dolls,
although this has never been verified. Although it is our firm belief while this is not a spot on Tom Baker sculpt it looks even less like Gareth Hunt.

denys fisher mego doctor who doll

The Doctor as every kid would first see him when they removed him from his packaging, Scarf, hat and Sonic Screwdriver were sealed away in the baggie, while the Doctor himself was twsit tied into place. (pic courtesy of Bill Frost)

boxed Denys fisher doctor who

Boxed UK version of the Doctor, this figure was also sold in Australia by Toltoys, who usually placed a sticker on the packaging

Mego Doctor Who produced by Denys Fisher was released in Italy by Harbert

Doctor Who in his Italian Harbert Box, (Courtesy of Mike Farence)

Italian (Harbert) boxes are usually the more commonly found even
today and shouldn’t go for more than $125-150 MIB

boxed Denys fisher doctor who

The Doctor never travels alone but Leela,
the savage was no ordinary companion. (boxed and Loose Leela courtesy of Bill Frost)

denys fisher leela

A precurser to Xena, Leela With her sexy outfit and warrior attitude
made Doctor Who viewing a father and son event and ratings soared.

Mego followed suit with a rather sexy doll of their own (it even
has cleavage), the sculpt is a dead on interpretation of actress
Louise Jamieson.

denys fisher leela

Mego k-9 from the Doctor Who line

K-9

The Doctor’s robotic pet K-9 was a companion like none other, the Robot dog spawned a slew of merchandise and his own spin off during his tenure. He was also the only “second wave” character to be released by Denys Fisher, who obviously realised his sales potential.

K-9 was introduced in the serial "The Invisible Enemy" and
stayed with Tom Baker almost to the very end.

Boxed Denys Fisher K-9 courtesy of Bill Frost.

Watch out for the Palitoy talking K9, it is
made by Tomy and has nothing to do with this line..

The Palitoy K-9 is much larger and easily distinguished.

The Giant Robot

The Mego Giant Robot

Despite only having a single appearance on the series a full two
seasons before this toyline launched, the Giant
Robot
was an obvious choice for the toyline and makes a smashing
addition.

The Mego Giant Robot

Here is a robot as you take him out of the box, note that shoulders come separately. These shoulders are often found missing in the secondary market.(pic courtesy of Bill Frost)

The Mego Giant Robot

The box describes him as the "Robot that controls the World." Well, that didn’t really happen but still, he’s one of the cooler designed creatures of the era so who cares?(pic courtesy of Bill Frost)

The Mego Giant Robot

Despite the serial in which he came from being simply called “Robot” and the character only grows large in the final chapter of the story, the word’s “Giant” have followed it’s name on a good deal of merchandising including the novelisation. The Robot’s name is actually K1 in the serial.

The Mego Giant Robot

The Mego Dalek is a touch short but a great representation

Perhaps even more famous than the Doctor himself
are the Daleks, his flagship villains.

The elusive box for the denys fisher dalek

Evil mutants in mini tanks, the Daleks have always
had a bit of a problem with living beings and they are always trying
to “Exterminate” them all.

The elusive box for the denys fisher dalek

Boxed Dalek courtesy of Bill Frost.

dalekart

A nice view of the beautiful Denys Fisher artwork.

palitoy dalek

Do not be fooled by the Palitoy Talking Dalek, it was made Tomy. Only Denys Fisher Daleks are mego produced nut as you can see above, the two do not look much alike..

Cyberman

the Denys Fisher Mego Cyberman is not a perfect likeness

the Denys Fisher Mego Cyberman is not a perfect likeness

The Cyberman have
been menacing the Doctor since the first incarnation of the Doctor
and their look has changed with almost every appearance.

The elusive box for the Mego Cyberman

The Mego Version more or less reflects the uniform
style used in episodes such as "Invasion" or "Revenge of the Cybermen"
but for some reason a cute button nose was added.There are a lot
of nice details to the figure such as the hoses sewn on to the suit
and the chest piece. These nice details and it’s unique silver finish
make the doll extremely fragile.

Mint loose Cybermen are a rarity as the outfit couldn’t
stand gentle play without falling apart, a shame for such a nice
figure.

The elusive box for the Mego Cyberman

Tardis

Mego Tardis utilized the same concept as the Mego Star Trek transporter

The Doctor’s time machine T.A.R.D.I.S
(Time and relative dimensions in Space) was given the mego treatment
as a playest.

The Tardis was given the Mego
Star Trek
transporter room treatment similiar to the UK release,
it’s a large chamber that you can make the Doctor appear and reappear.

The Tardis can be found boxed quite a bit but it’s fragile outside
(Cardboard) makes it hard to find mint/complete.

 

CHiPs Gallery

March 12, 2015
By


Chips 1982 CatalogAfter taking the airwaves by storm in 1977 Jon and Ponch were immortalized in Mego plastic and fabric in 1981-82. Forever young, yet their heads often suffer from migration, aka Zombie disease. Eric Estrada isn’t dead yet, but his corpselike face can often be found in discount bins at toy shows…

The popularity of the show sold quite a few of these  things for Mego between during their final sad 2 years.

Bruce Jenner CHiPS Mego head Bruce jenner Mego head Chips action figure
There were no villians in the 8: line although Mego had proposed adding Chopper from the Starsky and Hutch line, buyers balked.

This is the actual head prototype for the never produced 8″ Chips Officer Steve McLeish action figure.  In 1981, Bruce Jenner had joined the cast of Chips, and  Mego was all set to issue a figure when Jenner left the show.  This is the head test shot made of bronze, from a sculpt by Dana Green.

You get a lot of cool stuff with your Mego CHIPS figure. Gun belt, sunglasses, insignia stickers, watch, gun, helmet, cop-boots, and baton.

Mego Chips Launcher

Mego also marketed a bike luancher set similiar to the Evel Knievel sets that were very popular in the mid seventies. This particular set is from Italy and is courtesy of Olmo Giovannini.

Chips Ponch

While an authentic enough portrait of 1970’s uber-celebrity Erik Estrada this
may be one of the more disturbing Mego figures. All CHiPS heads tend to turn
Zombie grey, but Erik, with his odd yellow eyes can become especially creepy.

Chips Megos MOC

Loose Ponch

Chips Jon

The Jon doll based on actor Larry Wilcox.

Chips Megos MOC

Chips Sarge

The Sarge figure presents a very good likeness of veteren actor Robert Pine.

Chips Sarge MOC
Sarge was a later edition to the line which initially just
featured the principles.Carded CHiPs figures are still easily had, finding
minty examples is another story (Sarge courtesy of Micheal Farence)

 

Loose Sarge

Loose Ponch

Loose Jon

Chips Bike

The CHiPS bike is a re-use of Fonzie’s motorcycle. It’s a non-powered bike
with training wheels at the center. The chrome on the gas tank tends to lose
it’s luster. (Remember
trying to ride your bicycles in formation?)

CHIPS in formation

Tom provides us with shots of the CHiPs motorcycle, no Mego CHiPs figure
should be without their mad wheel. Those smiling faces would sure get alot
of bugs in their teeth…



Chips Bike Box Mego

Chips Bike in box insert

Helmet

 

helmet

All three Chips figures came with the same helmet of blue and gold. The helmet is subject to fading so the colors vary. This helmet has not been factory reproduced.

 

Billy Club

 

billy club

Billy Club, Night Stick, Baton, whatever you want to call it, all three Chips figures carry the same club. This club has not been factory reproduced.

 

 

belt

The Chips figures come with a utility belt that has a holster for their pistol and a holder for their club. This belt has pockets molded on it and has not been factory reproduced.

 

Pistol

 

pistol

The Chips figures carry a black pistol unique to the line which has not been factory reproduced.

 

Glasses

 

glasses

When you graduate from Chips school, you get issued your standard tough guy cop sunglasses and the characters in this line all have them. They are solid black and have not been factory reproduced.

 

 

watch

The Chips characters come with a black wrist watch that has not been factory reproduced.

 

Stickers

 

stickers

Jon and Ponch come with a 5 piece sticker sheet featuring a badge, generic name tag, shoulder patches and helmet sticker. These do not come pre-applied to the characters, they come on a sheet. The stickers have not been factory reproduced, but there are a lot of high quality home printed sticker sets floating around.

 

 

boots

All the Chips figures wear the same boots and they are unique to the line. Well, kind of. They are cut off Klingon boots, but the factory cut off boots only appear on the Chips figures. These boots have been reproduced by Cast-A-Way Toys. The reproductions are a much different material than the originals. The originals are a firm plastic. The reproductions are a soft rubbery material and thicker. The repro’s are also much more flat black than the originals. They are marked CAT on the bottom. Also pictured are photoshop similated cut off Klingon boots. By cutting off the tops of original Klingon boots, an almost factory Chips boot can be made. Classic TV Toys has reproduced the Klingon boot and they can be cut off to create the Chips boot as well. The CTVT boot has a rough texture to them, and they are marked CTV on the side.

CHiPs 3.75″ Toys

Carded 3″ Mego Chips Jon, note that the back also
promoted other lines such as Mego
Pocket Heroes,
Buck Rogers and Black Hole. In the late 70’s Mego was trying to cross promote their 3″ lines
much of this was the appeal to the 8″ line.

Mego Chips carded Ponch

Carded Ponch, this is Canadian Grand Toys Card and is much more difficult to find, courtesy Craig MacKillop.

Mego Chips carded Jon

Carded Jon action figure, also on a Canadian Grand Toys Card, courtesy Craig MacKillop.

Mego Chips carded Sarge

Sarge on his Grand Toys Card, courtesy Craig MacKillop.

Mego Chips carded Wheels Willy

Wheel’s Willy never appeared on the series, he is a recycled CB McHaul villain, photo courtesy Craig MacKillop.

Mego Chips carded Ponch

Jimmy Squeaks was another CB McHaul bad guy, Mego had also hoped to introduce Chopper into the 8″ line. This is Canadian Grand Toys Card, courtesy Craig MacKillop.

rare mego canadian two pack

Very rare Grand Toys “CHiPs 2+2” pack sold only in Canada. Courtesy of collector Mark Schmidt.

mego chips carded cycle

Carded cycle in Canadian Grand Toys packaging, courtesy of Craig MacKillop.

Chips 3 3/4

Cher Gallery

March 12, 2015
By

Cher Catalog PagesIn the 1970’s Mego essentially created and perfected the celebrity based toy. Seeking an entry into Barbie’s impenatrable pink fortress on the toy aisles Mego wisely exploited pop fascination with the divas of the day.

The Mego Museum has for years essentially ignored these toys outside of their impact on the larger Mego story. After all, this is a site built by boy toy fanatics for boy toy fanatics. That isn’t likely to change and there may never come a day when Cher and Farrah get the same insane treatment the Super Heroes and Star Trek receive. However, we are huge fans of the work the people at Mego did and these dolls embody some of the best of aspects of Mego. From the artfully crafted head sculpts to the brilliance of hiring Bob Mackie to design doll gowns Mego put a lot into these toys and surely made a solid profit from them.

So for now, until we have much more to say about these toys, we will let the pages of Mego’s fantastic product catalogs do the talking. Click on the image of the toys that interest you to enter the Mego Museum Catalog Library. Enjoy.



Mego Cher Doll 1976 Bob Mackie designs Mego Cher Doll 1976 Bob Mackie designs

1977

Mego Cher Doll 1976 Bob Mackie designs

1977 Cher Catalog1977 Cher Catalog

1978

1979

Buck Rogers Gallery

March 12, 2015
By

Mego produced Buck Rogers figures for 3 years

Rumour has it this line was bought as a favor to a licensing agent who had helped Mego out in the past.

12' Buck Roger's are easy to find, but rarely with a non-grey 'zombie head,'Mego Killer Kane

Mego Buck Rogers 25th Century Head Sculpt Detail Click to Enlarge
Mego Buck Rogers 25th Century Body Detail Click to Enlarge

12′ Buck Roger’s are easy to find, but rarely with a non-grey ‘zombie head.



Mego Buck Rogers  25th Century Killer Kane Head Sculpt Detail Click to Enlarge

Mego Buck Rogers 25th Century Killer Kane Body Detail Click to Enlarge

Killer Kane’s head sculpt is a dead ringer for the actor Henry Silva.

 

12″ Buck Rogers and Killer Kane display great likeness and attention to detail. Micheal Farrence photographs.

 

12″ Draco is a beautiful figure (courtesy of Troy) Below is walking Twiki for the 12″ line (also courtesy Troy)

 Mego Walking twiki fit in well with the 12 inch Buck Figures

Buck Rogers



Loose Buck Rogers

 

belt

Buck wears a black plastic belt with a sticker for details on the buckle. This belt is unique to the figure and has not been factory reproduced.



Weapon

 

weapon

Buck carries a weapon that can also be found on the 12″ Star Trek Klingon. It has not been factory reproduced.



Holster

 

holster

Buck carries his weapon in a holster that hooks on to his belt. It is unique to the figure and has not been factory reproduced.



Communicator

 

communicator

Buck has a communicator (or some such device) that attaches on to his belt that has sticker details. It is unique to the character and has not been factory reproduced.



Armband

 

armband

Buck has a paper sticker armband. It has not been factory reproduced.



 

shoes

Bucks shoes are made of soft white rubber. It is unique to the character and has not been factory reproduced.

Dr. Huer

 

Loose Dr. Huer

Medals

 

medals

Dr. Huer has a decal/sticker to represent his medals. This sticker is unique to the figure and has not been factory reproduced.



 

bootss

Huer wears the same black boots found on Killer Kane and Draco. They have not been factory reproduced.

 

Killer Kane

 


Loose Killer Kane

 

bootss

Kane wears the same black boots found on Dr. Huer and Draco. They have not been factory reproduced.

 

Draconian Guard

 

Loose Draconian Guard

 

belt

The Draconian Guard accents his waist with a stylish silver rope belt that has not been factory reproduced.



Weapon

 

weapon

The Draconian Guard carries a rifle that is unique to the character. It has not been factory reproduced.



 

socks

This character sports black knee high socks that have not been factory reproduced.



 

cuffs

The cuffs on the Draconian Guard are separate pieces made of a silver material similar to that used to make accents on the KISS figures. They have not been factory reproduced.



 

shoes

Mego created this funky spike toed shoe as kind of a sci-fi space villian generic footwear. Draconian Guard wears them as well as Tigerman. They can also be found on the Klingon from the 12″ Trek line, however Klingon’s shoes are made out of soft rubber, while Tigerman and Draconian Guard’s shoes are a hard plastic. They are definitely from the same mold though. This shoe has not been factory reproduced.

 

 

Loose Draco

 

crown

Draco’s crown is unique to the figure and has not been factory reproduced.



 

bootss

Draco wears the same black boots found on Killer Kane and Dr. Huer. They have not been factory reproduced.

 

Mego prototype walking Twiki figure

This sales sample of the walking Twiki Figure, meant to go along with the 12″ Buck Rogers figure is a new addition to the Museum galleries. The figure is completely solid and does not have any moving parts.

 

Mego prototype walking Twiki figure

Mego Designer Tory Mucaro happily elaborated on the process, the figure is made of Carbolon casting material used at Mego. He mentions ” I would guess the original pattern was sculpted on the outside, and we poured RTV molds and cast duplicates to be used as sales samples”

Mego prototype Twiki figure

This item was purchased from a former Mego sales person, so it makes perfect sense.

Mego prototype Twiki figure

A close up of the feet shows the carbolon material..

Loose Tigerman

Scabbard

 

scabbard

Tigerman houses his sword (when not in use) in a gold scabbard that is unique to the character and has not been factory reproduced.



 

sword

Tigerman’s weapon of choice is a gold sword. It is unique to the character and has not been factory reproduced.



 

socks

This character sports black knee high socks with cool gold trim. These are unique to the character and have not been factory reproduced.



 

cuff

Tigerman has a black cuff with gold trim he wears on his left wrist and only his left wrist. It has not been factory reproduced.



Armband

 

armband

Tigerman has an armband he wears on his right arm that matches his vest and shorts. It has not been factory reproduced.



 

shoes

Mego created this funky spike toed shoe as kind of a sci-fi space villian generic footwear. Tigerman wears them as well as Draconian Guard. They can also be found on the Klingon from the 12″ Trek line, however Klingon’s shoes are made out of soft rubber, while Tigerman and Draconian Guard’s shoes are a hard plastic. They are definitely from the same mold though. This shoe has not been factory reproduced.

World’s Greatest Super Heroes 8 Inch Figures

March 12, 2015
By
A Brief History of the World’s Greatest Super Heroes 8 Inch action figure.

Worlod's Greatest Super Heroes Trading Card Cover

1972 Outfitting Action Jackson bodies with new heads and familiar costumes, Mego creates the World’s Greatest Superheroes. The first tests were sold for Christmas at New York area 5&Dime EJ Korvetttes. The line comprised Superman, RC Batman, RM Robin and Aquaman in solid boxes.

1973 Three new heroes were added for the fall season Spiderman, Captain America and Tarzan. problematic solid boxes are replaced by retailer-friendly window boxes as well as “Kresge” cards.

1974 A big year with the addition of the Supergals Assortment which included Supergirl, Batgirl, Wonder Woman and Catwoman and the Superfoes Assortment featuring Riddler, Mr Myx, Joker and Penguin. Shazam also arrives to give a hand. 1974 saw the release of the Batmobile, Batcopter, Cycle and Batcave Playset as well.

1975 Here
come more Marvel heroes!
Hulk, Iron Man, Lizard Falcon and Green Goblin released. Fist Fighters (Batman, Robin, Joker, Riddler) launched

1976 O Mighty Isis arrives as well as the Fantastic  Four, Thor and Conan..

1977 The Teen Titans arrive. 1977 sees the departure of Tarzan and Wonder Woman from assortments and Mego switches from Window boxes to Blister
Cards

1978 No New Releases. The Card artwork changes but no new heroes are released .

1979 More Heroes Dropped. Myx, the FF, Conan, Thor, Aquaman,Lizard, Green Goblin, Falcon, Supergirl and midway through the year Isis are cut from the WGSH team.

1980 Trimming down. Riddler, Batgirl and Catwoman are yanked from assortments.

The Wizard of Oz

February 23, 2015
By

Follow the Yellow Brick Road was the theme of the 1975 Mego Catalog, evidence that in addition to a rapidly expanding lineup of toys from WGSH to Knights, Mego considered it’s Wizard of OZ license to be a great feather in it’s cap. 1975 Mego Catalog

Mego threw a gala Toy Fair party to launch in WOZ line and produced many of the surving cast of the landmark film.

Marty WOZ Party

Accessory Check: Wizard of Oz Original Accessories and Known Repros

The Wizard of Oz was and is one of Mego’s more popular lines. There are so many Oz fans over so many generations that these figures are still much sought after by collectors of Oz, not just Mego. This section features a list of accessories for each character in the line, as well as pictures and descriptions of the parts and their factory produced reproductions.

This page features the basic bodies used in the Oz line. There are various hand colors unique to certain characters but here we’ll address the basic bodies and their reproductions.

Type 1 Body

 

type1body

The first version of the mego male body was a metal rivet, less muscled body strung together with elastic. It has not been factory reproduced.



Type 2 Body

 

type2body

The second version of the Mego male body was more buff, had plastic joints instead of metal rivets, and is strung together with hooks and rubber. Both Doctor Mego and Classic TV Toys offer factory made repro Mego bodies. DM’s (marked 7th
Street Toys on the back) is very accurate in detail and appearance. Lighter
in flesh color, with a heavier feel and more rubbery hands. CTVT’s bodies (marked Figures, Inc. on the back)
are closer to original color, but tend to run a touch shorter, are more
fragile, and have a slightly different design. A telltale sign of the
CTVT body are the legs that tend to snap together at the knees. It should also be noted that Tim Mee produced the Type 2 body during the Mego era. This is a vintage knockoff that is identical in almost every way to the original body. It’s weight is perhaps a touch lighter, and the Mego copyright info on the back of the body has been blotted out, but otherwise it’s identical. Some of the hand colors have been reproduced by CTVT. They are a touch smaller, have a little flashing evident, and are more brittle.



Fat Body

 

fatbody

For the larger boys, Mego made the fat body. It was made both as type one (not pictured but put together like the standard T1 body) and as type two. Classic TV Toys offer factory made repro fat bodies. CTVT’s body’s
are pretty Mego accurate but are more
fragile. A telltale sign of the
CTVT body are the legs that tend to snap together at the knees. It is unmarked.



Female Body

 

femalebody

Mego Females came on two body styles, one had arms with no elbow joints (not pictured here). The common female body has elbow joints. Most are a similar color as the male body, but a few Mego females like the Wizard of Oz females, have a pinker looking skin tone. CTVT has made a reproduction body for the females, closer in color to the standard female body color instead of the pinker Oz female body color. The first version of the CTVT female body (not pictured) had a lot of issues. Cracks, lots of flashing and numorous other issues which are easy to spot. Some CTVT female bodies have a neck hole similar to the male body, instead of the neck stem that Mego used. CTVT eventually redesigned it’s female body to work out most of the issues. It’s close to Mego’s, although the legs still want to twist in an odd way. It is unmarked.



Star Trek

February 21, 2015
By

Mego’s “Star Trek” line was “officially” based on the live-action series in syndication in 1974, but the Mego designers appear to have referred repeatedly to The Animated Series for inspiration.  It’s not difficult to imagine why frugal, economical Mego would choose a property like “Star Trek” to exploit as part of the company’s eight-inch action figure line.  Since most of the crew wore the same basic uniform–and used the same weapons and equipment–Mego anticipated minimum design cost combined with maximum utilization potential–a win-win situation if ever one existed.  In fact, so high was Mego’s confidence in the line that they took the unprecedented step of creating specific lower-leg tooling for the male crew members.  The Starfleet-issued boots were incorporated into the figure itself, saving countless lost pairs of Mego footwear at the hands of careless children–as well as eliminating one more step in the assembly process.

Additionally, Mego had impeccable timing when it came to picking up the “Star Trek” license.  With a pittance of an investment, they bought into a virtually dead property that was in the throes of rebirth and rediscovery by a whole new legion of fans–fans clamoring for anything with the words “Star Trek” on it.
The original five “Star Trek” figures were released in 1974, and included Capt. Kirk, Mr. Spock, Dr. McCoy (Bones), Mr. Scott (Scottie), and the Klingon.  It is notable that these were the first 8″ Mego figures to be available exclusively on blister cards, having never been available in boxes throughout the entirety of their run.           The initial card art featured profile paintings of all five characters, the “Star Trek” logo in white, and each figure’s name depicted in white text above the bubble.  The package back also featured these same five profiles on a blue field.  These cards were later amended to include Lt. Uhura as the late, feminist-conscious addition to the first series.  Her profile was added to the line-up, and the “Star Trek” logo was changed to a more colorful light blue.  Additionally, the back was replaced with advertisements for the U.S.S. Enterprise Playset and Communicator walkie-talkies over a field of purple.  A later amendment to the first series cards consisted of changing the text of the figure’s name from white to the color of the respective character’s profile circle.          The first series was originally released on Type 1 bodies with several running changes in the facial paint schemes.  These were soon transitioned to Type 2 bodies, where the manufacturing settled down to a more uniform process.  As a rule-of-thumb, Type 1 bodies are found on “5-face” cards, while Type 2 bodies are found on “6-face” cards.  There have been “transitional” specimens found which do not conform to this distribution pattern, but they are quite uncommon.          All six figures were available individually through popular mail-order venues of the day (Sears, Montgomery Ward’s, etc.).  These mail-order figures each came in a clear plastic bag, which in turn was shipped in a small, non-descript brown carton.  Although not especially attractive or collectible, mailer boxes were far less prevalent than standard retail packaging, and, due in no small part to their underwhelming appearance, were most often discarded upon receipt.  Assembling a set of these figures in catalog packaging can be a daunting task; luckily, few collectors care enough to accept the challenge.  Additionally, the original five figures (sans Uhura) were included in an exceptionally-rare U.S.S. Enterprise Gift Set.  These figures came individually-packaged in baggies identical to their catalog brethren.  Type 1 figures were definitely included in the gift set; however, it cannot be confirmed whether the Enterprise saw a long-enough production lifespan which would have allowed the possibility of Type 2 inclusion.

Kirk, Spock, McCoy, and the Klingon were re-released in 1979 for Sears, presumably to provide supplemental product for Star Trek: The Motion Picture, as well as to clear out excess stock in Mego’s warehouse.  These reissues differ from the originals in three fundamental respects: first, they were assigned new assortment and item numbers; second (and most famously), in an excessive demonstration of economy, they were released without printing on the package back (earning them the nickname of “Blank-Backs”); and third, the majority of the reissues were given (once the backstock of traditional, two-part “stick-on” foil insignias had been depleted) what appear to be heat-sealed foil insignias, easily differentiated by their white edges.

As popular and collectible as the “Star Trek” crew figures are/were, a sizable warehouse discovery of these gems was unearthed in Canada in the mid-1980s, leading to a drop-off in value that the collecting community is only now beginning to recover from, some twenty years later.  This reduction in perceived value is both a blessing and a curse, however.  While the drop in monetary value has hurt many a speculator and investor in the short-term, the overall affordability and availability of these figures has made them a perennial favorite of collectors–both Star Trek and Mego alike–and a staple of even the most basic Mego collection.

The outstanding success of the “Star Trek” line naturally led to new releases over the next two years.  Mego’s first priority was to give the Enterprise crew more adversaries to fight.  In 1975, four new figures were released: a Neptunian, the Keeper, a Gorn, and a Cheron.  These characters were released under the new general heading of “Aliens.”          It is probably more accurate to describe these Aliens as “inspired by” rather than “from” the “Star Trek” series.  Mego was a pioneer in the field of licensing popular intellectual property for toy manufacture, and the problem with being a trailblazer is that there is no one ahead of you to set the standard.  Mego was making it up as they went, and Paramount, being just as inexperienced in licensing (and still not fully grasping the cultural phenomenon that “Star Trek” was becoming), wasn’t very concerned with cracking the whip of consistency.  As a result of this relaxed attitude to canonical adherence, the majority of the figures in the Aliens series can best be described as having merely a passing resemblance to their namesakes.  In several instances, the Alien figures bear more of a resemblance to The Animated Series designs than the The Original Series; this is presumably due to the fact that The Animated Series was currently broadcasting at the time Mego’s “Star Trek” line was in development.           These first Aliens are several orders of magnitude rarer than any of the crew or the Klingon, but common enough to carry fairly reasonable price tags, allowing even the most casual Mego collector to obtain them.  These figures stayed in production throughout the final series, which helps to explain the relative ease in acquiring them.          The figures released from this point on were all Type 2 bodies.  Due to the exotic nature of alien characters, most of the bodies used for the figures were of strange and unique colors, were of an abnormal size, or had unique, character-specific body components created for them.  These were all nice touches, to be sure, but they do not make the task of repairing figures any easier for the loose Mego collector.          Mego also created new card art for the Aliens series, a striking planetary vista with steep mountains rising to the left, and a red planet and blue moon hung against a black, starry night.  The back of the package featured new profile paintings of the ten figures available at that point, as well as ads for the Enterprise Playset, Tricorder, Tribble (whose existence is still debated to this day), Mission to Gamma VI Playset, Phaser Battle Game, Phaser Gun Game, Command Communications Console, and Communicators.  The card art for the UK Palitoy releases was even more impressive and bold, with profiles of the Aliens on the front, and a card back design very reminiscent of the original “5-face” card back.

In spite of many glaring inaccuracies and inconsistencies with the established “Star Trek” canon, these four Aliens sold well-enough to warrant a third (and, as it would turn out, final) series of “Trek” figures, consisting of four more Aliens: a Romulan, a Talosian, an Andorian, and a Mugato.  These four figures are counted among the rarest of Mego’s produced figures, due in no small part to a fire at a Mego facility which, as the legend maintains, consumed a large portion of the third series’ stock.  The fact that the word “legend” is used in this instance is a testament to the stature of these four figures and the fascination that surrounds their manufacture and relative scarcity; when you talk about series three, you’re not so much relating history as you are delving into action figure folklore.  These final Aliens rank up there with Alter Egos, Teen Titans, and Space: 1999, a fact borne out by the prices they consistently command.  Regardless of any warehouse disasters, this series of figures would still have been in high demand today if only for two reasons: the Romulan and the Andorian, two Aliens whose canonical accuracy and innate style almost make up for the glaring deficiencies present in the other six.          Mego, for reasons unknown, created new card art for these figures as well.  Actually, “recreated” is probably a more apt term, since they closely patterned the new design on the previous one, making only slight changes.  The new card art still depicted essentially the same planetary landscape, but it differed in several important respects: firstly, the “sky” was changed from black to blue; secondly, the stars were all-but-removed; thirdly, the card maintained the width of the previous card design, but was now noticeably taller; and fourthly, the card back now featured all fourteen of the “Star Trek” figures, while simultaneously eliminating half of the accessories advertised on the previous package to make room for the profile expansion.  In addition to releasing the final four Aliens on these new cards, Mego took the trouble to re-release the previous series of Aliens on the new card art as well.  This fact could be attributed to a desire for uniformity on Mego’s part, if it were not so painfully obvious from almost all other evidence that uniformity was pretty low on Mego’s list of priorities.          The eight-inch line of “Star Trek” figures effectively died with these last four Aliens; so, too, did every Trekkie’s dreams of a Harry Mudd or a Khan, a Sulu or a Chekov, a Nurse Chapel or a Yeoman Rand.  It would be left to the Mego customizers, a generation later, to pick up the ball that Mego dropped in 1976.

Mego had experienced tremendous success in the marketing of same-scaled vehicles and environments for their World’ Greatest Super-Heroes line and their Planet of the Apes series.  Almost immediately, “Trek” proved itself a runaway hit on the toy aisle.  In quick order, Mego decided to provide ancillary products for the “Star Trek” figures, in much the same vein as those afforded to the WGSH and Apes.  “Trek” proved a unique challenge, however.  Mego was used to designing cars, helicopters, motorcycles, vinyl playsets and the like in the eight-inch scale which they pioneered.  The first question the designers inevitably asked was this:          “How do you make a Starship in the eight-inch scale?”          Mego’s solution to this issue was inspired, and, in many ways, simply couldn’t be done today, with the current generation brought up on the prerequisite of ultra-realism in their toys.  Forgoing accuracy and instead focusing on play-value and bright, eye-catching colors, Mego unveiled the U.S.S. Enterprise Playset in 1975.  It was a tremendous success, as evidenced by the vast number of Enterprise Playsets that still turn up today; it seems that every boy in the mid-‘Seventies had one of these playsets.  This playcase is laughable by today’s toy craftsmanship standards, but its charm and innocence are hard to ignore.  Mego focused on the bridge of the Enterprise for its layout, but included a wing on each side of the playset devoted to two more key areas of the Enterprise.  On the right was a small room that was, at least ostensibly, the Engine Room (really nothing but a non-descript corner in which to stick your Scottie figure), and on the left was the real star of the toy, the Transporter Room.          The Transporter mechanism was an engineering feat even Scottie would be proud of.  To simulate the effect of “beaming,” you would put a figure in one side of a vertical tumbler, and spin the knob.  Brightly-colored labels would flash by as the cylinder spun, giving a rather art-deco interpretation to the act of Transporting.  By pressing one of two buttons on the top of the playset, you could stop the mechanism–on a dime!–in either the “beamed in” or “beamed out” position.  A secret door, not unlike those found on the cabinets of shifty illusionists, was present at the rear of the mechanism, allowing the child to remove the figure without the rest of the crew noticing!  Sneaky…

The Enterprise Playset, and its Transporter component, proved so popular that both the United Kingdom and the United States received one additional derivative playset each.  The UK “Trek” fans were treated to a stand-alone Transporter Room toy, released by Mego’s British associate, Palitoy-Bradgate, in lieu of an actual Enterpise Playet.  Alternatively, Mego buyers in America got, judging by the few specimens that exist, an extremely-limited Enterprise Gift Set which included the original five figures (Uhura being the odd woman out) on Type 1 bodies.  Little is known for certain about this Gift Set, aside from the fact that it exists.  Rumours abound that it was a Canadian exclusive, but this is unlikely, as Canada, along with France, got a smaller Enterprise Playset (about 10% smaller) for distribution, along with a smaller, bi-lingual box.  It is doubtful that two Enterprises of conflicting sizes were released in the same country.          Now that kids had the Enterprise, they needed somewhere to take it for an outer-space adventure.  Enter the Mission to Gamma VI Playset, a toy very loosely based on the “Trek” episode, “The Apple.”  The Gamma VI Playset came with a terribly fragile plant-trap, four tiny aliens that were way out of scale with the eight-inch “Trek” figures and which were easily lost, a plastic alien throne and idol facade which drew attention away from the cardboard-construction comprising the rest of the set, and a glove monster prone to rips and tears.  This playset was not widely-released to begin with; when you couple this fact with its extreme fragility and ease of piece-loss, you begin to understand the sky-high prices that this playset regularly demands.          A final eight-inch accessory was released, the Telescreen Console.  This toy is notable for being the only eight-inch accessory to require batteries.  The Telescreen Console was Mego’s answer to home video games in a pre-home-video-game world.  A screen, sitting in front of a captain’s chair, was used to display enemy targets which could be fired upon electronically.  This accessory is pretty unremarkable and primitive, and has limited long-term play value.  It’s the kind of toy that a six-year old will beg his mother for, only to tire of it after ten minutes of play.  Really, the only thing that qualifies this toy as an eight-inch accessory is the presence of the captain’s chair; other than that detail, this toy could easily be lumped into the role-playing category of Mego’s “Trek” offerings.  The Telescreen is rare, but it is also a rather underwhelming accessory–certainly the weakest of the five–so there are few collectors out there actively hunting one.          Mego made quite a few other accessories such as the tricorder, but these are all of a role-playing nature, and can be found here.            So, there you have it.  Mego was also responsible for the toys for Star Trek: The Motion Picture in 1979.  Mego abandoned the eight-inch scale for these releases, opting instead for two different scales: three-and-three-quarters inches and twelve inches.  These toys were, regrettably, not the Star Wars-killer that Mego had hoped for, but Mego really only had themselves to blame.  But that is another story for another time, and can be found at the Mego Movie Trek section for those interested.          Thanks to a wide accessibility and a huge pre-established collector base, the popularity of Mego’s “Star Trek” line is second only to the World’s Greatest Super Heroes.  For those just getting their feet wet, you can hardly do better than “Star Trek” to get initiated into the wonderful world of Mego!

The “Star Trek” Gallery would not have been possible without the contributions and assistance of Jeff Riemersma, Rob Chatlin, Mike “type1kirk” Farance, Kevin “MirrorSpock” Kaup, Jon and Phil.

Our Gang

February 19, 2015
By

og

Another unique licensing idea from Mego, Hal Roache’s Our Gang shorts were being broadcast in syndication after school across North America (I know I tuned in everyday) and it seemed like a great opportunity. .

Neal Kublan has admitted that the line was his idea and it really does look like a winner. Unfortunately it seems buyers ordered lightly so Our Gang never took off the way it maybe could have.

Often overlooked by collectors, the Our Gang line is one of Mego’s nicer lines, with excellent sculpts and attention to detail.

 

Our Gang 1976

 

Alfalfa

Our Gang Alfalfa Mego

Buckwheat

OG Darla Mego

Mickey

Our Gang Mego Porky

Spanky

Mego Spanky and his neat hat!

Our Gang Mego Porky

All carded Pics courtesy of
Troy

Playhouse

Our Gang Playhouse

Our Gang Mego Playhouse

OG

Our Gang Playhouse included this scooter cart

OG

Rowboat

Our Gang Boat

Our Gang Boat Box Mego 1976

Our Gang boat

Orange Crate Cart

Dinah

May 22, 2014
By